Anthony de Jasay

jasay@wanadoo.fr

Related Freeman Articles

Article

Think of a Number: A Theory of Rational Forecasting

MAY 21, 2009 by ANTHONY DE JASAY

We don't know how many blood-curdling economic forecasts are the result of career planning rather than sincere professional conviction. What we do know, though, is that such forecasts are the best method of deepening the gloom, frightening the credulous, and making the worst more probable.

Article

The Struggle to Subdue Luck

The War against Luck Cannot Be Won

APRIL 01, 2007 by ANTHONY DE JASAY

Article

Belt and Braces in the Labor Market

An Iron-Clad Labor Code is a Major Cause of France's Chronic Unemployment

JUNE 01, 2006 by ANTHONY DE JASAY

Like every exchange, the exchange of labor for money is protected, as it were, by a belt, the contract.

Article

How Not to Combat Corporate Corruption

Coping with the Principal-Agent Problem

OCTOBER 01, 2002 by ANTHONY DE JASAY

Related Publications

Archive

Think of a Number: A Theory of Rational Forecasting

JANUARY 19, 2009 by ANTHONY DE JASAY

An economist can gain notoriety and fill his appointment diary with lucrative conferences by having some of his forecasts for U.S. economic data, made two years ago and looking quite eccentric at the time, come gloriously true. This random event inspires me to put forward the sketch of a theory of rational forecasting.More . . .

A NEW article by Anthony de Jasay

CURRENT ISSUE

April 2014

Around the world, people are struggling to throw off authoritarianism, with deeply mixed results. From Egypt to Venezuela, determined people build networks to overthrow their regimes, but as yet we have not learned to live without Leviathan. In this issue, Michael Malice and Gary Dudney discuss their glimpses inside totalitarian regimes, while Sarah Skwire and Michael Nolan look at how totalitarian regimes grind down the individual--and how individuals fight back. Plus, Jeffrey Tucker identifies a strain in libertarianism that, left unchecked, could reduce even our vibrant movement to something that is analogous to the grim aesthetic of architectural brutalism. The struggle for our lives and freedom is a struggle for beauty; it begins inside each of us.
Download Free PDF

PAST ISSUES

SUBSCRIBE

RENEW YOUR SUBSCRIPTION

img E-mail Subscription

VIEW PRIVACY POLICY