Charles W. Baird

charles.baird@csueastbay.edu

Related Freeman Articles

Cliches of Progressivism

#10 – “I Have a Right!”

JUNE 20, 2014 by CHARLES W. BAIRD

Genuine rights are prior to government; they are part of your nature as an individual human.

Feature

Outrage in Illinois

FEBRUARY 21, 2014 by CHARLES W. BAIRD

Labor law frequently impinges on First Amendment rights. A new case might force the Supreme Court to finally take a long look at this issue.

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Employer Neutrality Agreements in Court

NOVEMBER 12, 2013 by CHARLES W. BAIRD

The Supreme Court is hearing another case on a common union practice that violates employees' and employers' freedom of association.

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Rex Obama and SCOTUS’ Labor Pains

Will the U.S.’s highest court rein in the Obama Administration and the NLRB?

AUGUST 26, 2013 by CHARLES W. BAIRD

President Obama likes to make up the rules--even Congress'--as he goes along, especially if it means helping out union cronies. It's now up to the Supreme Court to stop him.

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Milton Friedman, Right to Work, and Free Riders

APRIL 09, 2013 by CHARLES W. BAIRD

Right-to-work opponents like to argue that Milton Friedman opposed those laws. He did, but only because he opposed monopoly bargaining power. Until the NLRA is repealed, however, right-to-work at least offers some relief from the effects of monopoly bargaining.

CURRENT ISSUE

July/August 2014

The United States' corporate tax burden is the highest in the world, but innovators will always find a way to duck away from Uncle Sam's reach. Doug Bandow explains how those with the means are renouncing their citizenship in increasing numbers, while J. Dayne Girard describes the innovative use of freeports to shield wealth from the myriad taxes and duties imposed on it as it moves around the world. Of course the politicians brand all of these people unpatriotic, hoping you won't think too hard about the difference between the usual crony-capitalist suspects and the global creative elite that have done so much to improve our lives. In a special tech section, Joseph Diedrich, Thomas Bogle, and Matthew McCaffrey look at various ways these innovators add value to our lives--even in ways they probably never expected.
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