David J. Hebert

dave.hebert@gmail.com

David Hebert is a Ph.D. student in economics at George Mason University. His research interests include public finance and property rights.

Related Freeman Articles

Feature

The Paradox of Public Assistance

It’s time to acknowledge the pragmatic problems of welfare

JANUARY 24, 2014 by DAVID J. HEBERT

Instead of simply distributing more welfare, we should focus on removing the barriers that keep people from becoming productive.

Feature

If You Like Your Governance, You Can Keep It

You might be an anarcho-capitalist if you consider this case

DECEMBER 11, 2013 by DAVID J. HEBERT

Once you get past the scary terms, the case for anarcho-capitalism resembles the case for, say, being able to shop around for your healthcare.

Feature

That Cold-Hearted Discipline

Good economics teaches cooperation and the limits of politics, not greed

OCTOBER 30, 2013 by DAVID J. HEBERT

Economics does not so much teach greed but rather the beauty of cooperation. How else could we explain how a woolen coat gets made, how Paris gets fed, or how a pencil gets made?

Anything Peaceful

Helping Consumers by Avoiding Taxes

JUNE 24, 2013 by DAVID J. HEBERT

Congress has been bullying Apple, Google, and other companies who move business offshore to avoid taxes--even when they do it legally. Simply reducing tax rates would make loopholes less valuable and would benefit both consumers and producers.

Anything Peaceful

Oklahoma: The Economic Storm

MAY 24, 2013 by DAVID J. HEBERT

A tornado ravaged Oklahoma last week, destroying hundreds of homes, killing dozens, and injuring hundreds more. Unfortunately, it looks like the citizens of Oklahoma are about to be ravaged by another storm brought on by the Oklahoma Attorney General.

CURRENT ISSUE

July/August 2014

The United States' corporate tax burden is the highest in the world, but innovators will always find a way to duck away from Uncle Sam's reach. Doug Bandow explains how those with the means are renouncing their citizenship in increasing numbers, while J. Dayne Girard describes the innovative use of freeports to shield wealth from the myriad taxes and duties imposed on it as it moves around the world. Of course the politicians brand all of these people unpatriotic, hoping you won't think too hard about the difference between the usual crony-capitalist suspects and the global creative elite that have done so much to improve our lives. In a special tech section, Joseph Diedrich, Thomas Bogle, and Matthew McCaffrey look at various ways these innovators add value to our lives--even in ways they probably never expected.
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