Frederic Frederic Bastiat

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Plunder by Way of War Is Rooted in Man's Nature

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The role of man in a harmonious universe.

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Something Else

MAY 01, 1973 by FREDERIC BASTIAT

When it comes to protectionism, are we better able than Robinson Crusoe to see its fallacy?

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Should Teen-agers Vote?

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If voting is restricted, the reason is that each vote touches and affects everyone in the entire community.

Related Publications

Multimedia

The Law

NOVEMBER 16, 2012 by FREDERIC BASTIAT

Frederic Bastiat's timeless defense of classical liberalism. With his characteristically clear writing, Bastiat points out the flawed reasoning in his colleagues' arguments for Socialism, while laying out the formula for the proper role of the state in a free society.

Archive

The Law

SEPTEMBER 28, 2009 by FREDERIC BASTIAT

Related Podcasts

What Is Seen and What Is Not Seen

SEPTEMBER 26, 2013 by FREDERIC BASTIAT

In economics, an act, a habit, an institution, or a law produces not only one effect, but a series of effects. Of these effects, the first alone is immediate; it appears simultaneously with its cause; it is seen. The other effects emerge afterward; they are not seen. Basiat argues that a good economist must look at both the seen and unseen consequences of an action. (18:11 minutes)

Unfair Competition with the Sun

SEPTEMBER 26, 2013 by FREDERIC BASTIAT

Politicians often argue that cheat imports are bad for the domestic economy. In this podcast, Bastiat argues that competition from free trade actually increases domestic employment and income levels. (7:44 minutes)

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July/August 2014

The United States' corporate tax burden is the highest in the world, but innovators will always find a way to duck away from Uncle Sam's reach. Doug Bandow explains how those with the means are renouncing their citizenship in increasing numbers, while J. Dayne Girard describes the innovative use of freeports to shield wealth from the myriad taxes and duties imposed on it as it moves around the world. Of course the politicians brand all of these people unpatriotic, hoping you won't think too hard about the difference between the usual crony-capitalist suspects and the global creative elite that have done so much to improve our lives. In a special tech section, Joseph Diedrich, Thomas Bogle, and Matthew McCaffrey look at various ways these innovators add value to our lives--even in ways they probably never expected.
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