Richard W. Fulmer

richard_w_fulmer@hotmail.com

Richard Fulmer is a freelance writer from Humble, Texas, and the winner of the third annual Beth A. Hoffman Memorial Prize for Economic Writing for his article "Cavemen and Middlemen," from the April 2012 Freeman

Related Freeman Articles

Feature

Foxes, Hares, and the Monetary System

DECEMBER 10, 2013 by RICHARD W. FULMER

An economy is like an ecosystem. Central bankers have usually approached it like a kind of machine, tweaking here and rebalancing there--and frequently reversing cause and effect.

Anything Peaceful

Political Views in Three Dimensions

An update to the Nolan Chart

DECEMBER 09, 2013 by RICHARD W. FULMER

The Nolan Chart improved on the old left-to-right spectrum of political thought. Adding a third dimension could bring foreign policy considerations into the fold, providing a much more nuanced view.

Anything Peaceful

The Nation’s Full Faith and Credit Card

OCTOBER 29, 2013 by RICHARD W. FULMER

Our current system only encourages more feverish spending, to make sure you get your share. Time to cut up the credit card before our creditors do it for us.

Feature

Information Ages

Knowledge, Survival, and Progress

AUGUST 15, 2013 by RICHARD W. FULMER

Humans have always relied on information to survive, even to thrive. Government intervention, though, distorts prices and makes it that much harder to do what we do best.

Feature

Wrapping an Enigma in a Mystery: Why Inflation Is So Misunderstood

OCTOBER 31, 2012 by RICHARD W. FULMER

Inflation wouldn't be so hard to understand if it wasn't wrapped up in so much untruth, wishful thinking, and misdirection, Richard Fulmer says.

CURRENT ISSUE

July/August 2014

The United States' corporate tax burden is the highest in the world, but innovators will always find a way to duck away from Uncle Sam's reach. Doug Bandow explains how those with the means are renouncing their citizenship in increasing numbers, while J. Dayne Girard describes the innovative use of freeports to shield wealth from the myriad taxes and duties imposed on it as it moves around the world. Of course the politicians brand all of these people unpatriotic, hoping you won't think too hard about the difference between the usual crony-capitalist suspects and the global creative elite that have done so much to improve our lives. In a special tech section, Joseph Diedrich, Thomas Bogle, and Matthew McCaffrey look at various ways these innovators add value to our lives--even in ways they probably never expected.
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