Wayne Olson

wolson@fee.org

Wayne is FEE's Executive Director. He is 26-year veteran of the financial services sector, spending 18 years at Credit Suisse and its predecessor firm, The First Boston Corporation, in various executive roles. He brings significant management experience on both revenue-generating and support functions. Throughout his career, his primary focus has been new product development and marketing, which will be a top priority at FEE.

Related Publications

News

Strategic Notes from FEE—Turning the Tables

JULY 01, 2014 by WAYNE OLSON

We've been writing a lot in The Freeman lately about new business models that use digital technologies in ways that enable individuals to do business with each other directly, without a traditional merchant in the middle.

News

Strategic Notes from FEE—Seeing is Believing

JUNE 03, 2014 by WAYNE OLSON

When a student encounters a new idea or proposition about the world, before considering the question--"Do I believe this?"--he or she needs to see it in the mind's eye.

News

Strategic Notes from FEE—Bricks & Mortar

MAY 01, 2014 by WAYNE OLSON

FEE has entered into a contract for sale of its historic headquarters in Irvington-on-Hudson, NY and is consolidating its operations in rented office space in Atlanta.

News

Strategic Notes from FEE—Reaching New Audiences

APRIL 01, 2014 by WAYNE OLSON

If we want to grow as a community of freedom-loving people, we need to reach out to people who don't already share our world-view.

News

Strategic Notes from FEE—A Message from the Executive Director

MARCH 03, 2014 by WAYNE OLSON

FEE is pleased to inaugurate a new monthly update series called "Strategic Notes from FEE," coming out on or about the 1st of the month.

CURRENT ISSUE

July/August 2014

The United States' corporate tax burden is the highest in the world, but innovators will always find a way to duck away from Uncle Sam's reach. Doug Bandow explains how those with the means are renouncing their citizenship in increasing numbers, while J. Dayne Girard describes the innovative use of freeports to shield wealth from the myriad taxes and duties imposed on it as it moves around the world. Of course the politicians brand all of these people unpatriotic, hoping you won't think too hard about the difference between the usual crony-capitalist suspects and the global creative elite that have done so much to improve our lives. In a special tech section, Joseph Diedrich, Thomas Bogle, and Matthew McCaffrey look at various ways these innovators add value to our lives--even in ways they probably never expected.
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