William Anderson

banderson@frostburg.edu

Related Freeman Articles

Feature

Another Keynesian Error

MARCH 07, 2013 by WILLIAM ANDERSON

Keynesians--and "mainstream" economists in general--wrongly assume that consumption itself is a factor of production.

Related Publications

Archive

Don't Cry For Us, Argentina

U.S. Economic Policy Imitates Peronist Argentina

OCTOBER 21, 2009 by WILLIAM ANDERSON

The United States is facing perhaps its second-greatest economic crisis ever, and so far the government has taken page after page from Juan Peron's playbook.

Archive

Is a Weak Dollar a Strong Sign? Not So Fast!

Paul Krugman Borrows from Big Brother

OCTOBER 14, 2009 by WILLIAM ANDERSON

For all the talk that the government's policies of bailouts, printing money, and borrowing at record rates have "prevented" a second Great Depression, the truth is that all the government has done is to give the illusion of recovery while setting us up for an even worse Day of Reckoning.

Archive

Do We Need Another Stimulus?

A Second Stimulus Would Work No Better Than the First

OCTOBER 07, 2009 by WILLIAM ANDERSON

For the U.S. economy to have a real recovery, the economy first must shed the huge number of malinvestments that piled up like garbage on New York streets during the last unsustainable boom.

Archive

The Stimulus Helped the Economy? Not So Fast!

Government Make-Work Projects Will Not Be Key to Recovery

SEPTEMBER 30, 2009 by WILLIAM ANDERSON

Not only are they handing out money in a manner that imperils our future, but they also are demanding that it be spent on phantom things that intelligent people never would need in the first place.

CURRENT ISSUE

July/August 2014

The United States' corporate tax burden is the highest in the world, but innovators will always find a way to duck away from Uncle Sam's reach. Doug Bandow explains how those with the means are renouncing their citizenship in increasing numbers, while J. Dayne Girard describes the innovative use of freeports to shield wealth from the myriad taxes and duties imposed on it as it moves around the world. Of course the politicians brand all of these people unpatriotic, hoping you won't think too hard about the difference between the usual crony-capitalist suspects and the global creative elite that have done so much to improve our lives. In a special tech section, Joseph Diedrich, Thomas Bogle, and Matthew McCaffrey look at various ways these innovators add value to our lives--even in ways they probably never expected.
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