Aeon Skoble

Aeon J. Skoble is Professor of Philosophy and Chairman of the Philosophy Department at Bridgewater State University, in Massachusetts.

Related Freeman Articles

Three Books, One Island

Three Books, One Island: Aeon J. Skoble

JANUARY 10, 2013 by AEON SKOBLE

Remember the old thought experiment? "If you were starting over on an island and you had one book, what would it be?" With this new feature, we'll let really interesting people play the game. In our version, however, we'll let the author discuss three books: one recent book, one timeless book, and one book that challenges his or her world view.

--The Editors

It Just Ain't So

Coercion Is the Only Way to Ensure Health?

Ending Government Regulation of Health Care Would Improve Affordability

JUNE 01, 2008 by AEON SKOBLE

Article

Life, Liberty, and Retirement Pensions

We Need to Assert Our Right to Financial Independence

SEPTEMBER 01, 2005 by AEON SKOBLE

It Just Ain't So

Choice Is Too Burdensome?

A Coercive Pyramid Scheme Can't Be Morally Preferable

JULY 01, 2005 by AEON SKOBLE

It Just Ain't So

Decency Requires a Minimum-Wage Law?

Proponents of Minimum-Wage Laws Commit Logical, Economic and Moral Fallacies

MARCH 01, 2004 by AEON SKOBLE

Article

Neither Slavery Nor Involuntary Servitude

Proponents of Military Conscription Want to Accomplish Social Goals

SEPTEMBER 01, 2003 by AEON SKOBLE
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CURRENT ISSUE

April 2014

Around the world, people are struggling to throw off authoritarianism, with deeply mixed results. From Egypt to Venezuela, determined people build networks to overthrow their regimes, but as yet we have not learned to live without Leviathan. In this issue, Michael Malice and Gary Dudney discuss their glimpses inside totalitarian regimes, while Sarah Skwire and Michael Nolan look at how totalitarian regimes grind down the individual--and how individuals fight back. Plus, Jeffrey Tucker identifies a strain in libertarianism that, left unchecked, could reduce even our vibrant movement to something that is analogous to the grim aesthetic of architectural brutalism. The struggle for our lives and freedom is a struggle for beauty; it begins inside each of us.
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