Bettina Bien Greaves

Contributing editor Bettina Bien Greaves was a longtime FEE staff member, resident scholar, and trustee. She attended Ludwig von Mises’s New York University seminar for many years and is a translator, editor, and bibliographer of his works.

Related Freeman Articles

Book Review

Sowing the Wind: Essays and Articles on Popular Economic Policies that Make Matters Worse

The Voluntary Mechanisms of Production and Exchange Produce Superior Results

JULY 12, 2010 by BETTINA BIEN GREAVES

Book Review

Friedrich Hayek

An Illumination of a Great Advocate for Liberty

JUNE 30, 2010 by BETTINA BIEN GREAVES

Article

Remembering Henry Hazlitt

Hazlitt Both Reported on and Contributed to the Field of Economics

NOVEMBER 01, 2004 by BETTINA BIEN GREAVES

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Mises on Copyrights

New Technology Requires Refinement of Private Property Rights

JUNE 01, 2004 by BETTINA BIEN GREAVES

Book Review

The Day of Deceit: The Truth About FDR and Pearl Harbor

Commanders Were Deprived of Vital Military Intelligence

DECEMBER 01, 2000 by BETTINA BIEN GREAVES

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Market Money and Free Banking

Any Quantity of Money Is Adequate Because Prices Will Adjust

OCTOBER 01, 1999 by BETTINA BIEN GREAVES

Article

Leonard E. Read, Crusader

The Freedom Philosophy Remains an Ideal Worth Striving For

SEPTEMBER 01, 1998 by BETTINA BIEN GREAVES

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It Takes a Market

The Market Provides Countless Needed and Wanted Goods and Services

FEBRUARY 01, 1997 by BETTINA BIEN GREAVES
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CURRENT ISSUE

April 2014

Around the world, people are struggling to throw off authoritarianism, with deeply mixed results. From Egypt to Venezuela, determined people build networks to overthrow their regimes, but as yet we have not learned to live without Leviathan. In this issue, Michael Malice and Gary Dudney discuss their glimpses inside totalitarian regimes, while Sarah Skwire and Michael Nolan look at how totalitarian regimes grind down the individual--and how individuals fight back. Plus, Jeffrey Tucker identifies a strain in libertarianism that, left unchecked, could reduce even our vibrant movement to something that is analogous to the grim aesthetic of architectural brutalism. The struggle for our lives and freedom is a struggle for beauty; it begins inside each of us.
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