Donald Smith


Related Freeman Articles

Article

A Toast to the Holidays

DECEMBER 31, 2013 by DONALD SMITH

1991 was a wonderful year for liberty. Donald Smith's cause for celebration--that there are people willing to die to be free--remains true today. It's a cause for celebration, the usual nonsense of our rulers notwithstanding.

Article

Reflections on a Failure

Socialism Doesn't Offer the Slightest Incentive for Anyone to Make it Work

OCTOBER 01, 1997 by DONALD SMITH

Article

The One-Minute Shed

To the Bureaucratic Mind, a Rule Is a Rule

AUGUST 01, 1996 by DONALD SMITH

Article

Electability

There is no market for simple, unadorned competence in public life.

OCTOBER 01, 1992 by DONALD SMITH

There is no market for simple, unadorned competence in public life.

Article

The $100 Tree Fern

AUGUST 01, 1992 by DONALD SMITH

An item or service is worth only what another person is willing to pay.

Article

The Rifle by the Door

JULY 01, 1992 by DONALD SMITH

Although we don't like to admit it, the spirit of America is the spirit of resistance.

Article

Microcosm: The Decline of U.S. Competitiveness

JUNE 01, 1992 by DONALD SMITH

Our declining role in world markets is the fault of stifling government regulations.

Article

A Most Sensible Man

MAY 01, 1992 by DONALD SMITH

It was Smith who presented economics as a unique discipline and who first saw the producer and the consumer as vital elements in the economy of a nation.

Article

Sports: The Great American Surrogate

MARCH 01, 1992 by DONALD SMITH

What government has taken away, the Yankees, Bears, and Lakers have put back.

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CURRENT ISSUE

July/August 2014

The United States' corporate tax burden is the highest in the world, but innovators will always find a way to duck away from Uncle Sam's reach. Doug Bandow explains how those with the means are renouncing their citizenship in increasing numbers, while J. Dayne Girard describes the innovative use of freeports to shield wealth from the myriad taxes and duties imposed on it as it moves around the world. Of course the politicians brand all of these people unpatriotic, hoping you won't think too hard about the difference between the usual crony-capitalist suspects and the global creative elite that have done so much to improve our lives. In a special tech section, Joseph Diedrich, Thomas Bogle, and Matthew McCaffrey look at various ways these innovators add value to our lives--even in ways they probably never expected.
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