Sarah Skwire

 Sarah Skwire is a fellow at Liberty Fund, Inc. She is a poet and author of the writing textbook Writing with a Thesis.

Related Freeman Articles

Book Value

Sign It and Seal It

AUGUST 14, 2014 by SARAH SKWIRE

A play commemorating Magna Carta demonstrates nothing so much as the difficulty of making fine words on paper provide liberty in the real world.

Book Value

Spontaneous Overflow

JULY 31, 2014 by SARAH SKWIRE

The English country house has long inspired fascination; for early poets, though, it inspired its fair share of unease.

Book Value

How to Woo a Shrew

JULY 03, 2014 by SARAH SKWIRE

Shakespeare's Taming of the Shrew exemplifies how people can reach intimate, private agreements about how they'll relate to one another.

Book Value

The Very Model of a Modern Freeman Column

JUNE 19, 2014 by SARAH SKWIRE

The operettas of Sir William S. Gilbert and Sir Arthur S. Sullivan should appeal to any Freeman reader and to all political skeptics.

Book Value

The Exchange Value of a Magic Bean

JUNE 05, 2014 by SARAH SKWIRE

Money doesn't work in the fairy-tale context for precisely the reasons that it does work in the real world.

Book Value

Frak! Has Your Mother Sold Her Mangle?

Language—even profanity—evolves faster than it can be regulated

MAY 22, 2014 by SARAH SKWIRE

Authorities in Michigan are trying to crack down on swearing; fortunately, language is too spontaneous and too open to innovation for this plan to work.

Book Value

All of Life Is 6 to 5 Against

MAY 08, 2014 by SARAH SKWIRE

Damon Runyon's stories, beyond their unforgettable characters and cadence, look at how regular people try to beat the odds in real life.

Feature

To Read Well, a Noble Exercise

In Defense of Thoreau and Walden

APRIL 28, 2014 by SARAH SKWIRE

Gary North's recent column on Thoreau's Walden argues that the book is a badly written anti-capitalist fake. Sarah Skwire has other ideas.

Book Value

Happily Never After

APRIL 24, 2014 by SARAH SKWIRE

The Soviet fantasy extracted a terrible toll on its subjects, nearly costing them even the ability to create their own stories.

Book Value

His Aim Is True, Sometimes

APRIL 10, 2014 by SARAH SKWIRE

Shakespeare's play, known for its portrayal of greed, also opens questions about how we should relate to money--and leaves them open for us to ponder.

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CURRENT ISSUE

July/August 2014

The United States' corporate tax burden is the highest in the world, but innovators will always find a way to duck away from Uncle Sam's reach. Doug Bandow explains how those with the means are renouncing their citizenship in increasing numbers, while J. Dayne Girard describes the innovative use of freeports to shield wealth from the myriad taxes and duties imposed on it as it moves around the world. Of course the politicians brand all of these people unpatriotic, hoping you won't think too hard about the difference between the usual crony-capitalist suspects and the global creative elite that have done so much to improve our lives. In a special tech section, Joseph Diedrich, Thomas Bogle, and Matthew McCaffrey look at various ways these innovators add value to our lives--even in ways they probably never expected.
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