INTERMEDIATE

Economic Nationalism

MARCH 14, 2013

 

Economic nationalism is an ideology by which the global economy is subdivided in terms of nation-states. Adherents typically push protectionist policies that are driven by self-interest. For example, uneducated, low-wage workers may oppose an open immigration policy, outsourcing and off-shoring on the grounds these policies and actions may lower their wages. Such workers might vote for politicians who will place strict limitations on immigration policies in the name of protecting the native workers, but these limitations inevitably increase production costs and lower the standard of living for those citizens who are not afforded the special protection by the government.

Lawrence Reed - Protectionism

Ben Powell - Immigration Myths

Related Publications

ARCHIVE

"Protectionism" by Henry Hazlitt

SEPTEMBER 13, 2011 by NICHOLAS SNOW

MULTIMEDIA

A Critique of Protectionism

JULY 13, 2010

EVENTS

Free Trade v. Protectionism

MARCH 19, 2010

ARCHIVE

Obama and the Protectionist War Against the Poor

SEPTEMBER 16, 2009 by WILLIAM ANDERSON

Obama imposed new tariffs to please American union members, but the lower-paid workers in our country, however, will pay the deadly price, all in the name of "social justice" and "protecting American workers."

ARTICLE

That Mercantilist Commerce Clause

MAY 11, 2007 by SHELDON RICHMAN

The Commerce Clause of the U.S. Constitution has been used to justify a wide expansion of government power, from antidiscrimination laws to drug prohibition to a ban on guns near schools. In objecting to use of the Commerce Clause for such remote purposes, some constitutionalists rely on a particular historical interpretation of both the Clause and the Constitution as a whole. Could that interpretation be wrong? More . . .A NEW article by Sheldon Richman

ONLINE EVENTS

FEE offers live online events for people new to the economic, ethical, and legal principles of a free society.

CURRENT ISSUE

April 2014

Around the world, people are struggling to throw off authoritarianism, with deeply mixed results. From Egypt to Venezuela, determined people build networks to overthrow their regimes, but as yet we have not learned to live without Leviathan. In this issue, Michael Malice and Gary Dudney discuss their glimpses inside totalitarian regimes, while Sarah Skwire and Michael Nolan look at how totalitarian regimes grind down the individual--and how individuals fight back. Plus, Jeffrey Tucker identifies a strain in libertarianism that, left unchecked, could reduce even our vibrant movement to something that is analogous to the grim aesthetic of architectural brutalism. The struggle for our lives and freedom is a struggle for beauty; it begins inside each of us.
Download Free PDF

PAST ISSUES

SUBSCRIBE

RENEW YOUR SUBSCRIPTION

img E-mail Subscription

VIEW PRIVACY POLICY