BEGINNER

Democracy

In its purest form, democracy is a political system in which decisions are made directly by a voting majority. Most democracies are indirect. The United States, for example, is a democratic-republic: citizens vote for representatives who then pass or reject legislation by voting amongst themselves. 

Brad Birzer - Jacksonian America and the Rise of Democratic Man

Related Publications

ARCHIVE

Pattern for Revolt

JULY 03, 2013 by LEONARD E. READ

ARCHIVE

Against Majority Rule

OCTOBER 31, 2010 by NICHOLAS SNOW

Related Freeman Articles

ANYTHING PEACEFUL

Is Hive Democracy an Improvement?

OCTOBER 25, 2012 by MAX BORDERS

BOOK REVIEW

Soft Despotism, Democracy’s Drift: Montesquieu, Rousseau, Tocqueville, and the Modern Prospect

NOVEMBER 24, 2010 by ROSS B. EMMETT

Paul Rahe argues that American democracy is well down the road to the soft despotism that Tocqueville feared. But the outcome is not inevitable.

THE CALLING

Democracy, Deficit, and Debt

Buchanan and Wagner's classic.

APRIL 08, 2010 by STEVEN HORWITZ

Democracy in Deficit is one of those books that can profoundly change the way people think about economics.

ARTICLE

A Democracy of Dunces?

JUNE 01, 2007 by SHELDON RICHMAN

If bad economic policies are winning political platforms, the majority of voters are getting what they want. This is not good news.

Related Multimedia

ONLINE EVENTS

FEE offers live online events for people new to the economic, ethical, and legal principles of a free society.

CURRENT ISSUE

April 2014

Around the world, people are struggling to throw off authoritarianism, with deeply mixed results. From Egypt to Venezuela, determined people build networks to overthrow their regimes, but as yet we have not learned to live without Leviathan. In this issue, Michael Malice and Gary Dudney discuss their glimpses inside totalitarian regimes, while Sarah Skwire and Michael Nolan look at how totalitarian regimes grind down the individual--and how individuals fight back. Plus, Jeffrey Tucker identifies a strain in libertarianism that, left unchecked, could reduce even our vibrant movement to something that is analogous to the grim aesthetic of architectural brutalism. The struggle for our lives and freedom is a struggle for beauty; it begins inside each of us.
Download Free PDF

PAST ISSUES

SUBSCRIBE

RENEW YOUR SUBSCRIPTION

img E-mail Subscription

VIEW PRIVACY POLICY