BEGINNER

Democracy

In its purest form, democracy is a political system in which decisions are made directly by a voting majority. Most democracies are indirect. The United States, for example, is a democratic-republic: citizens vote for representatives who then pass or reject legislation by voting amongst themselves. 

Brad Birzer - Jacksonian America and the Rise of Democratic Man

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Paul Rahe argues that American democracy is well down the road to the soft despotism that Tocqueville feared. But the outcome is not inevitable.

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Democracy in Deficit is one of those books that can profoundly change the way people think about economics.

ARTICLE

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If bad economic policies are winning political platforms, the majority of voters are getting what they want. This is not good news.

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July/August 2014

The United States' corporate tax burden is the highest in the world, but innovators will always find a way to duck away from Uncle Sam's reach. Doug Bandow explains how those with the means are renouncing their citizenship in increasing numbers, while J. Dayne Girard describes the innovative use of freeports to shield wealth from the myriad taxes and duties imposed on it as it moves around the world. Of course the politicians brand all of these people unpatriotic, hoping you won't think too hard about the difference between the usual crony-capitalist suspects and the global creative elite that have done so much to improve our lives. In a special tech section, Joseph Diedrich, Thomas Bogle, and Matthew McCaffrey look at various ways these innovators add value to our lives--even in ways they probably never expected.
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