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Ludwig von Mises

Ludwig von Mises (Sept 29, 1881 – Oct 10, 1973) was  an Austrian School economist and classical liberal. Known for his highly influential magnum opus, Human Action: A Treatise on Economics, Mises explains the science of praxeology which he adopted as his methodological approach to the social sciences. Mises’ ideology significantly contributed to the insurgence of the 20th century libertarian movement in the United States.

Fun Fact: At the age of twelve Ludwig spoke fluent German, Polish, and French, read Latin, and could understand Ukrainian.

To learn more about the tenets of Austrian economics, apply for FEE's People Aren't Pawns summer seminar!

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Ludwig von Mises was a feminist when even the most revolutionary cultural center of his day denied women their full suite of rights. His act of intellectual entrepreneurship should remain an inspiration today.

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Forty years ago today, Ludwig von Mises died. And yet, much like Obi-Wan, his ideas are more powerful than ever in the face of empire.

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What Austrian Economics IS and What Austrian Economics Is NOT

NOVEMBER 14, 2012 by STEVEN HORWITZ

Steve Horwitz, Professor of Economics at St. Lawrence University, explains what Austrian Economics is and what Austrian Economics is not, clearing up some common misconceptions.

This video is based on Steve's essay by the same name:
http://www.coordinationproblem.org/2010/11/what-austrian-economics-is-and-wha...

To learn more about Austrian Economics, visit http://www.fee.org

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For centuries, hierarchical models dominated human organizations. Kings, warlords, and emperors could rally groups--but also oppress them. Non-hierarchical forms of organization, though, are increasingly defining our lives. It's no secret how this shift has benefited out social lives, including dating, and it's becoming more commonplace even in the corporate world. But it has also now come even to organizations bent on domination rather than human flourishing, as the Islamic State shows. If even destructive groups rely on this form of entrepreneurial organization, then hierarchy's time could truly be coming to an end.
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