BEGINNER

The Knowledge Problem

No one person holds all the relevant information needed to plan an economy. F.A. Hayek observed this in his widely cited article, "The Use of Knowledge in Society" where he points out  that the data required for rational economic planning are distributed among individual actors and thus exist unavoidably outside the knowledge of a central authority. 

Paul Cwik - Problems and Prices

Steve Horwitz - Hayek, the Market Order, and the Fatal Conceit

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CURRENT ISSUE

April 2014

Around the world, people are struggling to throw off authoritarianism, with deeply mixed results. From Egypt to Venezuela, determined people build networks to overthrow their regimes, but as yet we have not learned to live without Leviathan. In this issue, Michael Malice and Gary Dudney discuss their glimpses inside totalitarian regimes, while Sarah Skwire and Michael Nolan look at how totalitarian regimes grind down the individual--and how individuals fight back. Plus, Jeffrey Tucker identifies a strain in libertarianism that, left unchecked, could reduce even our vibrant movement to something that is analogous to the grim aesthetic of architectural brutalism. The struggle for our lives and freedom is a struggle for beauty; it begins inside each of us.
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