BEGINNER

Axiom of Human Action

FEBRUARY 21, 2013

Purposeful behavior by humans over economic (scarce) goods. To satisfy our wants and desires, we act. However, not all goals or wants can be satisfied at once. Due to scarcity, humans must choose to attain the goods they prefer while foregoing others.

 

Steven Horwitz - What Austrian Economics IS and What Austrian Economics Is NOT

 

Paul Cwik - The Foundational Difference Between Austrian Economics and the Mainstream

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CURRENT ISSUE

April 2014

Around the world, people are struggling to throw off authoritarianism, with deeply mixed results. From Egypt to Venezuela, determined people build networks to overthrow their regimes, but as yet we have not learned to live without Leviathan. In this issue, Michael Malice and Gary Dudney discuss their glimpses inside totalitarian regimes, while Sarah Skwire and Michael Nolan look at how totalitarian regimes grind down the individual--and how individuals fight back. Plus, Jeffrey Tucker identifies a strain in libertarianism that, left unchecked, could reduce even our vibrant movement to something that is analogous to the grim aesthetic of architectural brutalism. The struggle for our lives and freedom is a struggle for beauty; it begins inside each of us.
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