BEGINNER

Axiom of Human Action

FEBRUARY 21, 2013

Purposeful behavior by humans over economic (scarce) goods. To satisfy our wants and desires, we act. However, not all goals or wants can be satisfied at once. Due to scarcity, humans must choose to attain the goods they prefer while foregoing others.

 

Steven Horwitz - What Austrian Economics IS and What Austrian Economics Is NOT

 

Paul Cwik - The Foundational Difference Between Austrian Economics and the Mainstream

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The United States' corporate tax burden is the highest in the world, but innovators will always find a way to duck away from Uncle Sam's reach. Doug Bandow explains how those with the means are renouncing their citizenship in increasing numbers, while J. Dayne Girard describes the innovative use of freeports to shield wealth from the myriad taxes and duties imposed on it as it moves around the world. Of course the politicians brand all of these people unpatriotic, hoping you won't think too hard about the difference between the usual crony-capitalist suspects and the global creative elite that have done so much to improve our lives. In a special tech section, Joseph Diedrich, Thomas Bogle, and Matthew McCaffrey look at various ways these innovators add value to our lives--even in ways they probably never expected.
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