INTERMEDIATE

Economic Nationalism

MARCH 14, 2013

 

Economic nationalism is an ideology by which the global economy is subdivided in terms of nation-states. Adherents typically push protectionist policies that are driven by self-interest. For example, uneducated, low-wage workers may oppose an open immigration policy, outsourcing and off-shoring on the grounds these policies and actions may lower their wages. Such workers might vote for politicians who will place strict limitations on immigration policies in the name of protecting the native workers, but these limitations inevitably increase production costs and lower the standard of living for those citizens who are not afforded the special protection by the government.

Lawrence Reed - Protectionism

Ben Powell - Immigration Myths

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