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Do You Like the Mona Lisa More Than Your Mom?

AUGUST 07, 2014


Why is it so controversial when the government commissions art? Is it crazy to spend millions of dollars on a painting? What is the most valuable art you own? The answers to these questions, and what they can teach us about life and each other, might surprise you.

On August 12, 2014, host Janet Neilson was joined by Sarah Skwire of Liberty Fund to talk about the concept of subjective value and why it's important in art, economics, and life.

 

 

 

 

This event was based on the idea of subjective value

Follow Sarah Skwire's columns at The Freeman for lots more on art and liberty.

 

The following are useful links when thinking about art, economics, and freedom:

How to Talk to a Poet: Now With More Hayek! explores what poetry and Hayek can teach us about the discovery process. 

Bonfire of the Cliches discusses why literature might not be as hostile to the market as you might think.

No Art, No Liberty was a talk from the International Students for Liberty Conference in 2014. 

A preview of this talk and a chat about art and freedom was filmed at the conference by Liberty.me and can be viewed here:

 

Dr. Skwire's pieces on art, freedom, and peace can also be found in the Students For Liberty publications Why Liberty and Peace Love & Liberty.

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Biddle v. Borders on Moral Foundations

Do you believe a free order is justified by one single moral justification or by a number of different moral justifications?