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Liberty in Books: Madmen, Intellectuals and Academic Scribblers

MAY 14, 2013 by EDWARD J. LOPEZ, WAYNE LEIGHTON

In this webinar, Wayne Leighton and Edward Lopez talk about their book, "Liberty in Books: Madmen, Intellectuals, and Academic Scribblers". They argue that a crisis is neither necessary nor sufficient for meaningful political reform. Ideas have consequences only when the right conditions of time and place present themselves, and only when certain individuals -- we call them political entrepreneurs -- seize the opportunity.

ABOUT

EDWARD J. LOPEZ

Edward Lopez is Professor of Economics and the BB&T Distinguished Professor of Capitalism at Western Carolina University. He is a member of FEE Board of Scholars. 

ABOUT

WAYNE LEIGHTON

Wayne A. Leighton is Professor of Economics at Universidad Francisco Marroquín (UFM) in Guatemala, Executive Director of the Antigua Forum, Senior Expert at Navigant Economics, LLC, and and co-author (with Ed López) of Madmen, Intellectuals, and Academic Scribblers: The Economic Engine of Political Change

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