NEWS

Evening with FEE, featuring John Stossel

JANUARY 28, 2012 by TSVETELIN M. TSONEVSKI

On April 12, we will host Evening with FEE with special guest John Stossel. The Fox Business Channel anchor and The Freeman contributor will be presenting his new book No, They Can’t, scheduled for release in April.

About No, They Can’t:

From the myth that government can spend its way out of a crisis to be mistaken belief that labor unions protect workers, Stossel, a true libertarian, provides evidence that the reality is very different from what intuition tells us. His evidence leads to the taboo conclusions that:
· Government already dominates health care—and that’s the problem.
· The state keeps banning foods, but food bans don’t make us healthier.
· Government-run schools and teachers’ unions haven’t made kids smarter.*

The event will take place at the Renaissance Waverly Hotel in Atlanta, GA. For ticket information and sponsorship, visit: www.fee.org/stossel.

ABOUT

TSVETELIN M. TSONEVSKI

Tsvetelin Tsonevski is director of academic affairs at FEE. He holds an LL.M. degree in Law and Economics from George Mason School of Law.

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