NEWS

Inspire, Educate & Connect Summit Recap

FEBRUARY 10, 2014

Over 150 attendees joined FEE last weekend for its first ever Inspire, Educate & Connect Summit in Naples, FL. The event was a success, with students, alumni, supporters and partner organizations coming together to create an exciting and engaging atmosphere. The day program included talks from FEE president Lawrence W. Reed, Illinois Policy Institute CEO John Tillman, and several other prominent speakers, all stressing the importance of reaching out to newcomers with the ideas of liberty.
 
The day program concluded with the Leonard E. Read Alumni Award dinner, where economist Stephen Moore served as keynote speaker. Following Mr. Moore's speech, Gordon Cruickshank was awarded the first ever Leonard E. Read Distinguished Alumni Award, which recognized his contributions to the liberty movement over the course of the last thirty years. We are looking forward to the continued growth of the event, so be on the look out if you would like to join us next year!
 

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July/August 2014

The United States' corporate tax burden is the highest in the world, but innovators will always find a way to duck away from Uncle Sam's reach. Doug Bandow explains how those with the means are renouncing their citizenship in increasing numbers, while J. Dayne Girard describes the innovative use of freeports to shield wealth from the myriad taxes and duties imposed on it as it moves around the world. Of course the politicians brand all of these people unpatriotic, hoping you won't think too hard about the difference between the usual crony-capitalist suspects and the global creative elite that have done so much to improve our lives. In a special tech section, Joseph Diedrich, Thomas Bogle, and Matthew McCaffrey look at various ways these innovators add value to our lives--even in ways they probably never expected.
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THE ARENA

Spooner v. Bentham on Natural Rights

Which way do you lean on natural rights? Who do you find yourself agreeing with most often, Spooner or Bentham?