NEWS

Lawrence W. Reed Wins ‘Champions of Freedom' Award From The Mackinac Center

NOVEMBER 30, 2011 by BRIAN AITKEN

The entire staff at the Foundation for Economic Education would like to congratulate Lawrence W. Reed, president of the Foundation for Economic Education and president emeritus of the Mackinac Center for Public Policy, for winning the Mackinac Center’s “Champions of Freedom” award.

Reed served as the president of the Mackinac Center for Public Policy for twenty years and founded the “Champions of Freedom” award fifteen years ago. He has been president of the Foundation for Economic Education since leaving the Mackinac Center in 2008.

The Mackinac Center issued a Press Release which, in part, reads:

The award was conferred unanimously by the Center’s Board of Directors. It reads in part, “Lawrence W. Reed has championed the virtuous circle of self-help and civil society, maintaining, as he once wrote concerning the dozens of oppressed nations he had risked visiting: ‘We need to take time to assist our brothers and sisters who are laboring in the same vineyards, on behalf of the same causes. When we strengthen others, we all grow stronger.’”

Mackinac Center President Joseph G. Lehman introduced Reed, saying, “Larry Reed is a good man, but he’s also a great man. He’s been my friend and professional mentor for 17 years. His resume is stuffed with great achievements that you don’t hear him blowing his own horn about.”

Read the Mackinac Center for Public Policy’s Press Release about the award here and watch the ceremony here.

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