April Freeman Banner 2014

Archive

April 2014

Volume 64, 2014

Around the world, people are struggling to throw off authoritarianism, with deeply mixed results. From Egypt to Venezuela, determined people build networks to overthrow their regimes, but as yet we have not learned to live without Leviathan. In this issue, Michael Malice and Gary Dudney discuss their glimpses inside totalitarian regimes, while Sarah Skwire and Michael Nolan look at how totalitarian regimes grind down the individual--and how individuals fight back. Plus, Jeffrey Tucker identifies a strain in libertarianism that, left unchecked, could reduce even our vibrant movement to something that is analogous to the grim aesthetic of architectural brutalism. The struggle for our lives and freedom is a struggle for beauty; it begins inside each of us.

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March 2014

Volume 64, 2014

Should libertarians adopt the language and perspectives of identity politics? Where does that leave the individual? In this issue, Max Borders looks at our intellectual tradition and comes away skeptical that identity politics has any improvements to offer. Anne Wortham discusses her life and career as an individualist in a world anxious to reduce her to a demographic symbol and Sarah Skwire says privilege changes depending on the context. Plus Wendy McElroy looks at America's prison industry, Benjamin Powell discusses sweatshops, and much more.

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January/February

Volume 64, 2014

Phil Bowermaster walks us through the vision of nanotech's founder, his disillusionment with the hype surrounding nanotech--and sketches in the myriad innovations that, hype aside, have brought us to the cusp of a revolution as far-reaching as the agricultural, industrial, and informational revolutions combined. Speaking of revolutions, Jeffrey Tucker reports back from the thriving, vital front lines of culture--taking place, surprisingly, in century-old orchestra halls. Michael C. Munger offers libertarians a positive vision for society to replace the (perceived, at least) contrarianism some libertarians take as the end-all, be-all of the L-word. Everyone knows that the plague was brought to Europe by rats and spread because of changes in the climate; what they don't know, B.K. Marcus says, is the crucial role of power-hungry and tax-crazed rulers in making Europe's societies all the more vulnerable to collapse. L. J. Lane is back with another installment of his Of Mice and Mud comic, and much, much more.

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April 2014

Around the world, people are struggling to throw off authoritarianism, with deeply mixed results. From Egypt to Venezuela, determined people build networks to overthrow their regimes, but as yet we have not learned to live without Leviathan. In this issue, Michael Malice and Gary Dudney discuss their glimpses inside totalitarian regimes, while Sarah Skwire and Michael Nolan look at how totalitarian regimes grind down the individual--and how individuals fight back. Plus, Jeffrey Tucker identifies a strain in libertarianism that, left unchecked, could reduce even our vibrant movement to something that is analogous to the grim aesthetic of architectural brutalism. The struggle for our lives and freedom is a struggle for beauty; it begins inside each of us.
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