Freeman

ARTICLE

A Depressed Area or

MARCH 01, 1963 by H.P.B. JENKINS

Economist, Fayetteville, Arkansas


When evening breezes stirred the air

and shadows gathered length,

Old Kaspar settled in his chair

And husbanded his strength,

While Peterkin and Wilhelmine

Turned on the television screen.

 

They saw a shabby little town

Where all along the street

Were groups of idle workingmen

Who stood on shuffling feet

Or leaned against the leafless trees

With backs turned toward the chilling breeze

 

The children watched the scene awhile,

Then ran to Kaspar’s side.

"What makes those strikers look so glum?"

They both together cried.

"Won’t they get more to wear and

By all that loafing in the street?"

 

"They’re not on strike," Old Kaspar smiled

"To get a raise in pay."

The children stood with open mouths

As he went on to say:

"The local firms were all destroyed

And all these men are unemployed."

 

"There’s something wrong," cried Peterkin,

"Are they not organized?"

"It makes no difference," Kaspar said;

"For unions are devised

To handle picket lines and mobs

While business firms provide the jobs."

 

"Can’t everyone get higher pay

By loafing in the street?"

"There’s one condition," Kaspar sighed,

"Attached to such a feat.

You can’t have jobs to strike or shirk

Without a firm to give you work."

ASSOCIATED ISSUE

March 1963

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