April Freeman Banner 2014

ANYTHING PEACEFUL

Boettke Profiled in WSJ

AUGUST 30, 2010 by SHELDON RICHMAN

Peter Boettke, professor of economics at George Mason University, FEE trustee, and a great champion of Austrian economics, was profiled in the Wall Street Journal this past weekend (subscription site). A sample:

[T]he 50-year-old professor of economics at George Mason University in Virginia is emerging as the intellectual standard-bearer for the Austrian school of economics that opposes government intervention in markets and decries federal spending to prop up demand during times of crisis. Mr. Boettke, whose latest research explores people’s ability to self-regulate, also is minting a new generation of disciples who are spreading the Austrian approach throughout academia, where it had long been left for dead….

In the last decade at George Mason, he has helped recruit the Austrian school’s leading scholars and drawn students from around the world. Roughly 75% of his students have gone on to teach economics at the college or graduate level.

FEE also got a plug in the article: “The Austrian think tank Foundation for Economic Education had to turn students away this summer from its overflowing seminars.”

Congratulations, Professor Boettke!

ABOUT

SHELDON RICHMAN

Sheldon Richman is the former editor of The Freeman and TheFreemanOnline.org, and a contributor to The Concise Encyclopedia of Economics. He is the author of Separating School and State: How to Liberate America's Families.

comments powered by Disqus

EMAIL UPDATES

* indicates required
Sign me up for...

CURRENT ISSUE

April 2014

Around the world, people are struggling to throw off authoritarianism, with deeply mixed results. From Egypt to Venezuela, determined people build networks to overthrow their regimes, but as yet we have not learned to live without Leviathan. In this issue, Michael Malice and Gary Dudney discuss their glimpses inside totalitarian regimes, while Sarah Skwire and Michael Nolan look at how totalitarian regimes grind down the individual--and how individuals fight back. Plus, Jeffrey Tucker identifies a strain in libertarianism that, left unchecked, could reduce even our vibrant movement to something that is analogous to the grim aesthetic of architectural brutalism. The struggle for our lives and freedom is a struggle for beauty; it begins inside each of us.
Download Free PDF

PAST ISSUES

SUBSCRIBE

RENEW YOUR SUBSCRIPTION