April Freeman Banner 2014

ARTICLE

Getting The Country Moving

SEPTEMBER 01, 1962 by H.P.B. JENKINS

Economist, Fayetteville, Arkansas

The leaves were dying on the trees
and turning red and gold.
Old Kaspar sniffed the evening air
And felt the coming cold,
While Peterkin and Wilhelmine
Looked at the allegoric screen.

They saw a hill where groups of men
Were milling round and round
In search of gaps between the rocks

That littered up the ground;
While others loitered in the shade
Where rows of feather beds were laid.

The few who seemed to find a way
Among the rocky tracks

Were forced to carry other men
Who perched upon their backs,
Till burdened far beyond their size
They’d fall to earth and fail to rise.

"Now tell us what it’s all about! "
The little children cried.

"It’s Movement on the New Frontier,"
Old Kaspar soon replied.
"They’re off to gain the higher ground
Where joy and affluence abound."

"Why aren’t some," asked Peterkin,
"Allowed to reach the top?"
"They’re free to climb,"
Old Kaspar sighed,
"Or try until they drop.

Of course, it’s hard to climb the tracks
With people riding on their backs."
"Why couldn’t some just lead the way
And let the others walk?"
"A few would like it," Kaspar said,
"But all the rest would balk
At any chance they might be thrown
On no resources but their own."

ASSOCIATED ISSUE

September 1962

comments powered by Disqus

EMAIL UPDATES

* indicates required
Sign me up for...

CURRENT ISSUE

April 2014

Around the world, people are struggling to throw off authoritarianism, with deeply mixed results. From Egypt to Venezuela, determined people build networks to overthrow their regimes, but as yet we have not learned to live without Leviathan. In this issue, Michael Malice and Gary Dudney discuss their glimpses inside totalitarian regimes, while Sarah Skwire and Michael Nolan look at how totalitarian regimes grind down the individual--and how individuals fight back. Plus, Jeffrey Tucker identifies a strain in libertarianism that, left unchecked, could reduce even our vibrant movement to something that is analogous to the grim aesthetic of architectural brutalism. The struggle for our lives and freedom is a struggle for beauty; it begins inside each of us.
Download Free PDF

PAST ISSUES

SUBSCRIBE

RENEW YOUR SUBSCRIPTION