Freeman

BOOK REVIEW

Global Bondage

A Commendable Exposure of Deleterious U.N. Activities

NOVEMBER 01, 1996 by LAURENCE M. VANCE

Mr. Vance is an instructor at Pensacola Bible Institute and a free-lance writer living in Pensacola, Florida.

If you think that U.S. income taxes are too high, the tax code too complex, and IRS methods too harsh, then think again. How would you like to pay a global tax collected by faceless bureaucrats at the United Nations?

Global Bondage, by journalist Cliff Kincaid, who regularly contributes to the conservative weekly Human Events, is a fully documented introductory study of the globalist ambitions of the United Nations that will appeal to conservatives and libertarians who don’t subscribe to conspiracy theories.

Although the U.N. did not exist until 1945, its roots go back to the end of World War I. In a speech before Congress on February 11, 1918, President Woodrow Wilson declared: What we are striving for is a new international order. Wilson’s new international order, however, was never established, for the U.S. Senate rejected Wilson’s League of Nations on March 19, 1920. It took another war for Wilson’s new international order to come to fruition. Now, with the 50th anniversary of the U.N. and the continued utilization of its peacekeeping forces, the U.N. is once again being examined and exposed as what Kincaid calls a horribly mismanaged bureaucracy with tremendous waste, fraud, and abuse.

In six chapters, Kincaid lays out the case against the U.N.’s support of terrorists and communists, government-mandated universal health coverage, forced abortion and sterilization under the guise of population control, gross mismanagement of funds, and massive corruption.

Those who on principle oppose the twin evils of foreign aid and foreign interventionism should be especially alarmed at the continued U.S. funding of the organization. The U.S. taxpayer support of the U.N. and its member states is foreign aid at its worst, for many of the nations we lavish subsidies on regularly vote against us in the U.N. According to Kincaid, member nations vote in favor of U.S. positions only 17 percent of the time. The United States also contributes billions of dollars every year to fund the various U.N. operations. Global intervention in the affairs of other countries by the United States is bad enough, but supplying troops for U.N. peacekeeping and subordinating American troops to foreign command is even worse. Kincaid cites figures from the General Accounting Office showing that U.N. peacekeeping cost the United States more than $10 billion from fiscal year 1992 to fiscal year 1995.

Although, as Kincaid points out, most U.N. opponents are dismissed as members of the John Birch Society, recent developments have confirmed claims he makes in Global Bondage. In order to have a world government, the U.N. must have a continuous source of revenue like any government. Thus, early in 1996, U.N. Secretary General Boutros Boutros-Ghali called for a light international tax to finance the U.N.

The globalist goals of the U.N. should be a cause for alarm to any defender of liberty and limited government. Quoting the late Murray Rothbard, Kincaid makes the case that U.N. activities amount to international government despotism to be exercised by faceless and arrogant bureaucrats accountable to no one. But as Kincaid further points out, international government despotism by the U.N. is more insidious and dangerous than the U.S. variety because it is further beyond the ability of most Americans to do anything about.

Although Kincaid recognizes that the U.N.’s concept of free trade involves giving international bureaucracies the power to manage trade relations between states, he neglects to make a case for real free trade. And aside from some remarks about the evils of predatory trade partners such as Japan, and his puzzling statement that the legalization of drugs would entail a massive expansion of government power, Kincaid is to be commended for his documented exposure of U.N. activities that are not only deleterious to the United States but financed by it as well.

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November 1996

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