Freeman

ANYTHING PEACEFUL

High School Students Gain an Introduction to the Real World

AUGUST 13, 2013 by SARA MORRISON

FEE’s summer seminars for high school students concluded at the end of July with Intro to the Real World, a seminar that not only looked at the basics of economics but also at practical applications, such as “Paycheck 101” and “The Rising Cost of College.”  Seventy-six participants from 22 different states were able to take part in lectures and activities as well as spend some time at Berry College, the world’s largest college campus.

Bruce Rottman opened the seminar by explaining how to think like an economist, laying the foundation for the seminar. Later, students learned the true cost of the minimum wage from Dr. Antony Davies of Duquesne University with his interactive experiment. Dr. Ivan Pongracic, a longtime lecturer for FEE, introduced students to public choice theory, and Dr. James Harrigan closed the seminar by inspiring participants to make a difference in the world.

On Wednesday, students enjoyed a short tour of Berry and got the chance to meet members of the economics department, headed up by Frank Stephenson. Stephenson gave a short presentation on what it means to be an economics major at Berry, and many students were able to have one-on-one conversations with faculty members about college decisions.

As participants look to enter into the “real world,” they are encouraged to stay connected with their peers by joining the FEE Alumni Network.

ABOUT

SARA MORRISON

Sara Morrison is the High School Programs Manager at FEE.

comments powered by Disqus

EMAIL UPDATES

* indicates required
Sign me up for...

CURRENT ISSUE

July/August 2014

The United States' corporate tax burden is the highest in the world, but innovators will always find a way to duck away from Uncle Sam's reach. Doug Bandow explains how those with the means are renouncing their citizenship in increasing numbers, while J. Dayne Girard describes the innovative use of freeports to shield wealth from the myriad taxes and duties imposed on it as it moves around the world. Of course the politicians brand all of these people unpatriotic, hoping you won't think too hard about the difference between the usual crony-capitalist suspects and the global creative elite that have done so much to improve our lives. In a special tech section, Joseph Diedrich, Thomas Bogle, and Matthew McCaffrey look at various ways these innovators add value to our lives--even in ways they probably never expected.
Download Free PDF

PAST ISSUES

SUBSCRIBE

RENEW YOUR SUBSCRIPTION