Freeman

BOOK REVIEW

In Defense of Freedom and Related Essays

A Small but Controversial Tract

MAY 01, 1996 by WILLIAM C. DENNIS

Dr. Dennis is Senior Program Officer at Liberty Fund, Inc., in Indianapolis.

In 1962, Frank S. Meyer, then Senior Editor at National Review, published his small, but controversial tract, In Defense of Freedom: A Conservative Credo (Henry Regnery). Here Meyer argued that what American conservatives had to conserve was largely an Anglo-American tradition of liberty. The purpose of the political order was to preserve individual liberty, Meyer maintained. Questions of virtue were to be left to the institutions of the great civil society. But only individually free-willed acts could produce virtue; so freedom and virtue were necessarily allies not enemies.

In this day of continued conservative factionalism, it would still profit people of good will on the right, particularly the younger conservative, to consider the implications of Meyer’s thesis.

ASSOCIATED ISSUE

May 1996

comments powered by Disqus

EMAIL UPDATES

* indicates required
Sign me up for...

CURRENT ISSUE

July/August 2014

The United States' corporate tax burden is the highest in the world, but innovators will always find a way to duck away from Uncle Sam's reach. Doug Bandow explains how those with the means are renouncing their citizenship in increasing numbers, while J. Dayne Girard describes the innovative use of freeports to shield wealth from the myriad taxes and duties imposed on it as it moves around the world. Of course the politicians brand all of these people unpatriotic, hoping you won't think too hard about the difference between the usual crony-capitalist suspects and the global creative elite that have done so much to improve our lives. In a special tech section, Joseph Diedrich, Thomas Bogle, and Matthew McCaffrey look at various ways these innovators add value to our lives--even in ways they probably never expected.
Download Free PDF

PAST ISSUES

SUBSCRIBE

RENEW YOUR SUBSCRIPTION