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POETRY

Tirzah

APRIL 17, 2013 by FREDERICK TURNER

Give me a vision of your city, friend.
Law’s zodiac of idols has withdrawn
Into the royal blue of that day’s dawn:
Now revelation’s bans are at an end.
We’re all apostles, wear the cardinal’s hat
When the old Holy Fathers pass away.
Science and art as once before hold sway
(You knew I had to say something like that).
Lovers awake within their pretty rooms.
Children are hugged and safe now everywhere.
Our priests and priestesses are grown-ups too.
Now fleshly love is valued for its blooms,
Now a strange music hovers in the air;
Now death itself is but a deeper blue.

ASSOCIATED ISSUE

June 2013

ABOUT

FREDERICK TURNER

Frederick Turner, Founders Professor of Arts and Humanities at the University of Texas at Dallas, was educated at Oxford University. Poet, critic, translator, philosopher, and former editor of The Kenyon Review, he has authored over 30 books, including Natural Classicism, The Culture of Hope, Genesis: An Epic Poem, April Wind, Hadean Eclogues, The New World, Shakespeare's Twenty-First Century Economics, Paradise, Natural Religion, Two Ghost Poems, and Epic: Form, Content, History.  With his colleague Zsuzsanna Ozsváth he won Hungary’s highest literary honor for their translations of Miklós Radnóti’s poetry. He has been nominated for the Nobel Prize for Literature internationally over 80 times.

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April 2014

Around the world, people are struggling to throw off authoritarianism, with deeply mixed results. From Egypt to Venezuela, determined people build networks to overthrow their regimes, but as yet we have not learned to live without Leviathan. In this issue, Michael Malice and Gary Dudney discuss their glimpses inside totalitarian regimes, while Sarah Skwire and Michael Nolan look at how totalitarian regimes grind down the individual--and how individuals fight back. Plus, Jeffrey Tucker identifies a strain in libertarianism that, left unchecked, could reduce even our vibrant movement to something that is analogous to the grim aesthetic of architectural brutalism. The struggle for our lives and freedom is a struggle for beauty; it begins inside each of us.
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