Freeman

April 1971

Volume 21, 1971

FEATURES

Some Thoughts on Violence

APRIL 01, 1971 by EDMUND OPITZ

A diagnosis of today's cult of violence and an appeal for a return to reason the divine spark in man.

Uneven Inflation

APRIL 01, 1971 by GEORGE HAGEDORN

The uneven response of various prices and incomes introduces distortions and inequities into the economy.

The Worrycrats

APRIL 01, 1971 by LEONARD E. READ

A special breed of bureaucratic worriers for whom all citizens are compelled to pay.

"Thou Shalt Not Drink"

APRIL 01, 1971 by MARY BENNETT PETERSON

The story of Prohibition and Repeal and its lesson for modern regulators.

Poor Relief in Ancient Rome

APRIL 01, 1971 by HENRY HAZLITT

Another example of the way in which relief programs get out of hand and destroy the economy, including the intended beneficiaries.

Education for Privacy

APRIL 01, 1971 by MARTEN TEN HOOR

A plea for education for privacy when so many are occupied with the improvement of others.

Revenue Sharing

APRIL 01, 1971 by PAUL L. POIROT

A new name for inflation.

The Biology of Behavior

APRIL 01, 1971 by ROGER J. WILLIAMS

Our biological differences should convince us that uniformity is not a rule of life.

Property

APRIL 01, 1971 by JAMES MADISON

Property embraces everything to which a man may attach a value and have a right, and which leaves to everyone else the like advantage.

1  2 

Download File

EMAIL UPDATES

* indicates required
Sign me up for...

CURRENT ISSUE

July/August 2014

The United States' corporate tax burden is the highest in the world, but innovators will always find a way to duck away from Uncle Sam's reach. Doug Bandow explains how those with the means are renouncing their citizenship in increasing numbers, while J. Dayne Girard describes the innovative use of freeports to shield wealth from the myriad taxes and duties imposed on it as it moves around the world. Of course the politicians brand all of these people unpatriotic, hoping you won't think too hard about the difference between the usual crony-capitalist suspects and the global creative elite that have done so much to improve our lives. In a special tech section, Joseph Diedrich, Thomas Bogle, and Matthew McCaffrey look at various ways these innovators add value to our lives--even in ways they probably never expected.
Download Free PDF

PAST ISSUES

SUBSCRIBE

RENEW YOUR SUBSCRIPTION