Freeman

April 1974

Volume 24, 1974

FEATURES

Markets and Morals

APRIL 01, 1974 by ROGER DONWAY

The consumer is king in a free market, but no one is compelled to serve him.

Choice or Chains

APRIL 01, 1974 by RIDGWAY K. FOLEY JR.

Men free to choose among alternatives may dwell in harmony, not in chains.

On Misery and Rule

APRIL 01, 1974 by STANLEY C. MCDONALD

To relieve the individual of suffering is to deny him an important guide to choice and action.

The Puritan Experiment in Common Ownership

APRIL 01, 1974 by GARY NORTH

The important discovery that social peace is best achieved through private ownership of the means of production.

Best Housing Hope

APRIL 01, 1974 by BERNARD SIEGAN

An unrestricted private market affords the best chance for better housing for the less affluent.

The Sanctifying of Plunder

APRIL 01, 1974 by LEONARD E. READ

Let the law defend the rightful owner of property rather than the thief.

The Motive Force of Society

APRIL 01, 1974 by FREDERIC BASTIAT

The role of man in a harmonious universe.

Is Inflation Here to Stay?

APRIL 01, 1974 by MORRIS J. MARKOVITZ

An inquiry into the monetary policies which cause inflation, and prospects for a cure.

The Necessity of Government

APRIL 01, 1974 by DAVID KELLEY

Coercion has a place in social life, but it must be kept in place.

A Reviewer's Notebook - 1974/4

APRIL 01, 1974 by JOHN CHAMBERLAIN


"Toward a New World Monetary System" edited by G. Carl Wiegand

"The People Factor: Managing the Human Climate" by Philip Lesly

"Psycho Chemical Warfare: The Chinese Communist Drug Offensive Against the West" by A. H. Stanton Candlin


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