Freeman

April 1975

Volume 25, 1975

FEATURES

Occupational Licensure Under Attack

APRIL 01, 1975 by MELVIN D. BARGER

A plea for free choice, rather than government control, in hiring skilled help.

Modern Soothsayers

APRIL 01, 1975 by BERNARD SIEGAN

The present practice of freedom affords the best hope for the future.

The Great Depression

OCTOBER 01, 1969 by HANS SENNHOLZ

A survey of four distinct phases of the "great depression," with reasons and understanding that may help to avert repetition.

The Message of Depression

APRIL 01, 1975 by PAUL L. POIROT

Stop the monetary manipulation and the waste of scarce resources.

Marx, Mises and the Interest Doctrines

APRIL 01, 1975 by DAVID OSTERFELD

Whether one sees conflict or harmony of interests under capitalism depends upon his theory of value.

Can this Marriage Be Saved?

APRIL 01, 1975 by WILLIAM D. BURT

Concerning the principles behind the Constitution and the prospects for preserving our liberty under law.

In Search of Freedom

APRIL 01, 1975 by BEN MOREELL

A businessman's early warning to other businessmen of the effects of interventions and controls.

A Reviewer's Notebook - 1975/4

APRIL 01, 1975 by JOHN CHAMBERLAIN


"Uplift: What People Themselves Can Do" sponsoredby Jaycees Foundation

"Anarchy, State, and Utopia" by Robert Nozick

"Everything You Need to Know Now about Gold and Silver" edited by Louis Carabini

"Ceremonial Chemistry: The Ritual Persecution of Drugs, Addicts and Pushers" by Thomas Szasz


Download File

EMAIL UPDATES

* indicates required
Sign me up for...

CURRENT ISSUE

July/August 2014

The United States' corporate tax burden is the highest in the world, but innovators will always find a way to duck away from Uncle Sam's reach. Doug Bandow explains how those with the means are renouncing their citizenship in increasing numbers, while J. Dayne Girard describes the innovative use of freeports to shield wealth from the myriad taxes and duties imposed on it as it moves around the world. Of course the politicians brand all of these people unpatriotic, hoping you won't think too hard about the difference between the usual crony-capitalist suspects and the global creative elite that have done so much to improve our lives. In a special tech section, Joseph Diedrich, Thomas Bogle, and Matthew McCaffrey look at various ways these innovators add value to our lives--even in ways they probably never expected.
Download Free PDF

PAST ISSUES

SUBSCRIBE

RENEW YOUR SUBSCRIPTION