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April 1997

Volume 47, 1997

FEATURES

The Entrepreneur on the Heroic Journey

Why Are Entrepreneurs Seldom Viewed as Heroes?

APRIL 01, 1997 by DWIGHT R. LEE, CANDACE ALLEN

The Free Market: Lifting All Boats

The Free Market Does Not Leave the Poor Behind

APRIL 01, 1997 by DON MATHEWS

Stockholders as Stakeholders

Stakeholder Theory Places Corporate Managers in the Impossible Position of Balancing Competing Interests from Multiple Groups

APRIL 01, 1997 by EDWARD YOUNKINS

Star Trek and Collectivism: The Case of the Borg

Star Trek Shows What a Society Ruled by the Collective Mind Would Look Like

APRIL 01, 1997 by STEVEN YATES

The Myth of the Independent Fed

The Fed May Be the Worst Government Monopoly of Them All

APRIL 01, 1997 by THOMAS J. DILORENZO

What Big Government Is All About

If We Are the Government, Why Do We Get So Many Policies We Don't Want?

APRIL 01, 1997 by DAVID BOAZ

Can the Budget Be Cut?

Few Government Expenditures Are More Obnoxious Than Corporate Welfare

APRIL 01, 1997 by DOUG BANDOW

Government-Mandated Insecurity

Social Security Must Be Replaced, Not Fixed

APRIL 01, 1997 by TADD WILSON

Competition in Education: The Case of Reading

Only the Marketplace Can Determine the Best Pedagogy

APRIL 01, 1997 by DANIEL HAGER

Benjamin Franklin: The Man Who Invented the American Dream

APRIL 01, 1997 by JIM POWELL

Benjamin Franklin pioneered the spirit of self-help in America. With less than three years of formal schooling, he taught himself almost everything he knew. He took the initiative of learning French, German, Italian, Latin, and Spanish. He taught himself how to play the guitar, violin, and harp. He made himself an influential author and editor. He started a successful printing business, newspaper, and magazine. He developed a network of printing partnerships throughout the American colonies.

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Around the world, people are struggling to throw off authoritarianism, with deeply mixed results. From Egypt to Venezuela, determined people build networks to overthrow their regimes, but as yet we have not learned to live without Leviathan. In this issue, Michael Malice and Gary Dudney discuss their glimpses inside totalitarian regimes, while Sarah Skwire and Michael Nolan look at how totalitarian regimes grind down the individual--and how individuals fight back. Plus, Jeffrey Tucker identifies a strain in libertarianism that, left unchecked, could reduce even our vibrant movement to something that is analogous to the grim aesthetic of architectural brutalism. The struggle for our lives and freedom is a struggle for beauty; it begins inside each of us.
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