Freeman

April 1998

Volume 48, 1998

FEATURES

Inventing Life in Cuba

When Ideology Is Used as a Vehicle of Control, Economic and Social Devastation Follows

APRIL 01, 1998 by MARC A. OLSHAN

Roberto and Fidel: Two Versions of Share the Wealth

Societies That Stifle Voluntary Exchange Waste the Talents and Resources of Their People

APRIL 01, 1998 by T. NORMAN VAN COTT, CECIL E. BOHANON

The NFL Oilers: A Case Study in Corporate Welfare

How Houston's Struggle against Stadium Subsidies Failed

APRIL 01, 1998 by RAYMOND J. KEATING

In Defense of Markets and Misers

People Don't See the Value of Dispersed Benefits

APRIL 01, 1998 by CANDACE ALLEN

The Myth of an Emerging Information Underclass

New Technologies Don't Need Subsidies to Spread to Consumers

APRIL 01, 1998 by GARY DEMPSEY

Defining State and Society

Definitions Can Shift Dramatically Depending on the Theoretical Approach of the Speaker

APRIL 01, 1998 by WENDY MCELROY

An Earlier Response to Environmental Tyranny

English History Provides an Example of the Restoration of Property Rights to the People

APRIL 01, 1998 by DANIEL WALKER

Global Warming: Hot Problem or Hot Air?

The Earth Is Not on the Brink of Environmental Ruin

APRIL 01, 1998 by JONATHAN H. ADLER

There's Some Good in Gouging

Dramatic Price Increases in Times of Crisis Help Keep Economies Operating Smoothly in Distressed Regions

APRIL 01, 1998 by KAREN SELICK
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