Freeman

April 2000

Volume 50, 2000

FEATURES

Just Dial 911? The Myth of Police Protection

Most Police Have No Legal Duty to Protect Citizens from Criminal Attack

APRIL 01, 2000 by RICHARD W. STEVENS

Toward an Austrian Critique of Governmental Economic Policy

Regulation Interferes with the Spontaneous Market Process

APRIL 01, 2000 by ISRAEL M. KIRZNER

The Microsoft Case: Divestiture Won't Help Consumers

Trust-Busters and Courts Don't Know How to Maximize Shareholder Return Better Than Private Entrepreneurs

APRIL 01, 2000 by D. T. ARMENTANO

Barbarians at Bill Gates

Antitrust Is about Interest-Group Politics, Not Consumer Protection

APRIL 01, 2000 by WILLIAM F. SHUGHART II

Economic Illiteracy

Are Today's Students Unwilling to Accept Positions Purely on the Basis of Rational Argument?

APRIL 01, 2000 by PAUL A. CLEVELAND

Economic Growth and Freedom in the Coming Millennium

Globalization Is a Great Liberalizer

APRIL 01, 2000 by CHRISTOPHER LINGLE

Drifting In and Out of Socialism: The Case of Ireland

Ideology Is Insignificant in Irish Politics

APRIL 01, 2000 by JAMES L. PAYNE

Food, Famine, and Free Trade

Ehrlich Fails to See That Incentives Change Behavior

APRIL 01, 2000 by JAMES PERON

Free Trade and Flexible Markets

Only Flexible Economies Can Grow and Prosper

APRIL 01, 2000 by CHRISTOPHER MAYER

American Culture

We Enjoy Comforts, Conveniences, Culture, Knowledge, and Entertainment from around the World

APRIL 01, 2000 by DONALD BOUDREAUX
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The United States' corporate tax burden is the highest in the world, but innovators will always find a way to duck away from Uncle Sam's reach. Doug Bandow explains how those with the means are renouncing their citizenship in increasing numbers, while J. Dayne Girard describes the innovative use of freeports to shield wealth from the myriad taxes and duties imposed on it as it moves around the world. Of course the politicians brand all of these people unpatriotic, hoping you won't think too hard about the difference between the usual crony-capitalist suspects and the global creative elite that have done so much to improve our lives. In a special tech section, Joseph Diedrich, Thomas Bogle, and Matthew McCaffrey look at various ways these innovators add value to our lives--even in ways they probably never expected.
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