Freeman

April 2004

Volume 54, 2004

FEATURES

Globalization and Free Trade

Free Trade Is the Path to a Bright Economic Future

APRIL 01, 2004 by RICHARD EBELING

Tax Breaks Aren't Subsidies

No One Should Be Begrudged the Opportunity to Keep His Own Money

APRIL 01, 2004 by SHELDON RICHMAN

Ending Farm Subsidies Wouldn't Help the Third World?

Policies Distort World Trade in Agricultural Products

APRIL 01, 2004 by E.C. PASOUR

Cashing a Cheque in the Third Millennium A.D.

Regulations Have a Way of Becoming Minimum Standards

APRIL 01, 2004 by ROBERT E. WRIGHT

Government Control of Medicine: Thanks, But No Thanks

The Free Market Works Like Crazy to Find New and Better Solutions

APRIL 01, 2004 by RALPH HOOD

There's Still Work to Do

The Benefits of Free Trade Are Not Readily Traceable

APRIL 01, 2004 by SHELDON RICHMAN

The Economic Causes of War

Laissez Faire and Free Trade Would Make Many Wars Unnecessary

APRIL 01, 2004 by LUDWIG VON MISES

What's Wrong with the Poverty Numbers

Changing Government Policies Would Do Much to Alleviate Poverty

APRIL 01, 2004 by ROBERT P. MURPHY

How Nineteenth-Century Americans Responded to Government Corruption

Constitutional and Legal Reform Dealt Mercantilist Interventionism an Enormous Blow

APRIL 01, 2004 by JAMES ROLPH EDWARDS
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The United States' corporate tax burden is the highest in the world, but innovators will always find a way to duck away from Uncle Sam's reach. Doug Bandow explains how those with the means are renouncing their citizenship in increasing numbers, while J. Dayne Girard describes the innovative use of freeports to shield wealth from the myriad taxes and duties imposed on it as it moves around the world. Of course the politicians brand all of these people unpatriotic, hoping you won't think too hard about the difference between the usual crony-capitalist suspects and the global creative elite that have done so much to improve our lives. In a special tech section, Joseph Diedrich, Thomas Bogle, and Matthew McCaffrey look at various ways these innovators add value to our lives--even in ways they probably never expected.
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