Freeman

April 2008

Volume 58, 2008

FEATURES

Exporting and Importing at the University

Only Workaholics See Intrinsic Value in Their Exports

APRIL 01, 2008 by T. NORMAN VAN COTT

Slick Construction Under the Articles of Confederation

Original Intent, Meaning, or Understanding Is Inevitably Multiple

APRIL 01, 2008 by JOSEPH R. STROMBERG

Presidents Can't Manage the Economy

Determining What Trade-Offs to Make in a World of Scare Resources Is Best Left to the Free Market

APRIL 01, 2008 by JOHN STOSSEL

Savoring "Three Cups of Tea": An Essay on the Future of Politics

Voluntarism, Not Interventionism, Is the Way to Make the World a Better Place

APRIL 01, 2008 by JAMES L. PAYNE

Health Care Cons

Repeal the myriad interventions.

APRIL 01, 2008 by SHELDON RICHMAN

The Free Market's Invisibility Problem

Libertarians Need More Visual Strategies to Advertise Their Beliefs

APRIL 01, 2008 by JOSEPH PACKER

The Return of Debtors' Prison?

Eliminating Civil Imprisonment Would Improve Justice in the United States

APRIL 01, 2008 by WENDY MCELROY

Banning Payday Loans Deprives Low-Income People of Options

Though Expensive, Sometimes Payday Loans Are the Best Option

APRIL 01, 2008 by GEORGE C. LEEF

Downtown Revitalization: City Governments Versus Consumers

Government Planners Lack the Incentive and Ability to Accurately Forecast What Consumers Want

APRIL 01, 2008 by JACOB H. HUEBERT
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The United States' corporate tax burden is the highest in the world, but innovators will always find a way to duck away from Uncle Sam's reach. Doug Bandow explains how those with the means are renouncing their citizenship in increasing numbers, while J. Dayne Girard describes the innovative use of freeports to shield wealth from the myriad taxes and duties imposed on it as it moves around the world. Of course the politicians brand all of these people unpatriotic, hoping you won't think too hard about the difference between the usual crony-capitalist suspects and the global creative elite that have done so much to improve our lives. In a special tech section, Joseph Diedrich, Thomas Bogle, and Matthew McCaffrey look at various ways these innovators add value to our lives--even in ways they probably never expected.
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