Freeman

August 1976

Volume 26, 1976

FEATURES

U.S. Defense and the Multinational Corporation

AUGUST 01, 1976 by WILLIAM H. PETERSON

The MNC is an important force for world development and for world peace.

Rights Are Freedoms, Not Powers

AUGUST 01, 1976 by OSCAR W. COOLEY

Our rights are freedoms to seek and establish, it we can, the good ways of life.

Where the Monetarists Go Wrong

AUGUST 01, 1976 by HENRY HAZLITT

The problem is not to devise a political formula to regulate the stock of money but to take such control out of the hands of politicians.

Work and Liberty

AUGUST 01, 1976 by CLARENCE B. CARSON

The modern disparagement of the "work ethic" is a campaign against individual growth and fulfillmenta campaign against civilization and liberty.

In Defense of Apathy

AUGUST 01, 1976 by THOMAS W. HAZLETT

"Mind Your Own Business" is a proper political slogan for free men in a free land.

American Money: Past, Present and Future

AUGUST 01, 1976 by CHARLES WEBER

The rapid monetary expansion of the past 15 years can be curbed if there is a will.

A New Message: IV. Comments on The Bill of Rights

AUGUST 01, 1976 by JACKSON PEMBERTON

Words of courage and counsel from the hearts of the Founding Fathers to their children in a troubled nation.

A Reviewer's Notebook - 1976/8

AUGUST 01, 1976 by JOHN CHAMBERLAIN


"Plain Talk" edited by Isaac Don Levine'

"A Gang of Pecksniffs" by H.L. Mencken

"No Land Is an Island: Individual Rights and Government Control of Land Use" by various authors

"Other People's Property" by Bernard H. Siegan


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