Freeman

August 1992

Volume 42, 1992

FEATURES

Losing the Cold War

AUGUST 01, 1992 by CHRISTOPHER WHALEN

The accumulation of public sector debt is the root of many problems facing the U.S. economy.

Friedrich A. Hayek (1899-1992)

AUGUST 01, 1992 by PETER BOETTKE

Successive generations of scholars, intellectuals, and political activists throughout the world will long be pursuing questions that Hayek has posed.

Tough Love for the Needy

AUGUST 01, 1992 by JAMES L. PAYNE

Habitat workers promote self-reliance--and success--in the needy they are trying to help.

The Property Rights Origins of Privacy Rights

AUGUST 01, 1992 by MARY CHLOPECKI

Privacy and property rights are intimately linked.

The $100 Tree Fern

AUGUST 01, 1992 by DONALD SMITH

An item or service is worth only what another person is willing to pay.

How Capitalism Saved the Whales

AUGUST 01, 1992 by JAMES S. ROBBINS

Abraham Gesner, John D. Rockefeller, and Thomas Edison saved more whales than GreenPeace ever will.

Charity in the Land of Individualism

AUGUST 01, 1992 by JOHN D. FARGO

True charity lies deep within the fertile soil of authentic individualism.

Freedom and Majority Rule

JUNE 01, 2005 by EDMUND OPITZ

Politics reflects the character of the people.

A Future That Should Have Been Ours

AUGUST 01, 1992 by JOHN C. SPARKS

Living standards may be 1,000 years behind where they should be thanks to bad government.

Three's a Crowd

AUGUST 01, 1992 by ROBERT ZIMMERMAN

For our society to function in a healthy manner, we must abandon this notion that a third party (i.e., the government) can resolve our differences.

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