Freeman

December 1972

Volume 22, 1972

FEATURES

Back to Basics - Fable of the Berry Pickers

DECEMBER 01, 1972 by W. A. PATON

An expert recurs to basic principles for light on some of today's complex problems.

Six Ideas to Keep Us Human (Part II)

DECEMBER 01, 1972 by EDMUND OPITZ

How free will, rationality, self-responsibility, beauty, goodness, and a sense of the sacred may restore man.

The Argentine Inflation

DECEMBER 01, 1972 by ALBERTO LYNCH

Another sad chapter in the long list of the failures of fiat money.

Are You Getting Your Money's Worth?

DECEMBER 01, 1972 by W. M. CURTISS

Questioning the faith that human errors could be avoided if only the government were in total control of our lives.

The Founding of the American Republic: 17. Principles of the Constitution

DECEMBER 01, 1972 by CLARENCE B. CARSON

The concepts of federalism, republicanism, separation of powers, limited government, and transformation of empire.

A Perfect System of Government?

DECEMBER 01, 1972 by LUDWIG VON MISES

Government is indispensable because men are not faultless, but it can never be perfect.

A Reviewer's Notebook - 1972/12

DECEMBER 01, 1972 by JOHN CHAMBERLAIN


"The Essential Paul Elmer More - a Selection of His Writings" edited by Byron C. Lambert

"Enterprise Denied: Origins of the Decline of the American Railroads, 1897-1917" by Albro Martin

"The Growth of Economic Thought" by Henry W. Spiegel

"The Evolution of Economic Thought" by W. E. Kuhn

"An Economist's Protest" by Milton Friedman


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