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December 1972

Volume 22, 1972

FEATURES

Back to Basics - Fable of the Berry Pickers

DECEMBER 01, 1972 by W. A. PATON

An expert recurs to basic principles for light on some of today's complex problems.

Six Ideas to Keep Us Human (Part II)

DECEMBER 01, 1972 by EDMUND OPITZ

How free will, rationality, self-responsibility, beauty, goodness, and a sense of the sacred may restore man.

The Argentine Inflation

DECEMBER 01, 1972 by ALBERTO LYNCH

Another sad chapter in the long list of the failures of fiat money.

Are You Getting Your Money's Worth?

DECEMBER 01, 1972 by W. M. CURTISS

Questioning the faith that human errors could be avoided if only the government were in total control of our lives.

The Founding of the American Republic: 17. Principles of the Constitution

DECEMBER 01, 1972 by CLARENCE B. CARSON

The concepts of federalism, republicanism, separation of powers, limited government, and transformation of empire.

A Perfect System of Government?

DECEMBER 01, 1972 by LUDWIG VON MISES

Government is indispensable because men are not faultless, but it can never be perfect.

A Reviewer's Notebook - 1972/12

DECEMBER 01, 1972 by JOHN CHAMBERLAIN


"The Essential Paul Elmer More - a Selection of His Writings" edited by Byron C. Lambert

"Enterprise Denied: Origins of the Decline of the American Railroads, 1897-1917" by Albro Martin

"The Growth of Economic Thought" by Henry W. Spiegel

"The Evolution of Economic Thought" by W. E. Kuhn

"An Economist's Protest" by Milton Friedman


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April 2014

Around the world, people are struggling to throw off authoritarianism, with deeply mixed results. From Egypt to Venezuela, determined people build networks to overthrow their regimes, but as yet we have not learned to live without Leviathan. In this issue, Michael Malice and Gary Dudney discuss their glimpses inside totalitarian regimes, while Sarah Skwire and Michael Nolan look at how totalitarian regimes grind down the individual--and how individuals fight back. Plus, Jeffrey Tucker identifies a strain in libertarianism that, left unchecked, could reduce even our vibrant movement to something that is analogous to the grim aesthetic of architectural brutalism. The struggle for our lives and freedom is a struggle for beauty; it begins inside each of us.
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