Freeman

December 1995

Volume 45, 1995

FEATURES

The Arts in a Free Market Economy

Capitalism Is a Prescription for Producing and Distributing Great Art

DECEMBER 01, 1995 by TYLER COWEN

Ludwig van Beethoven's Joyous Affirmation of Human Freedom

Beethoven Inspired the World

DECEMBER 01, 1995 by JIM POWELL

Experiencing Socialist Britain

A Personal Tale of Work in Two Nationalized Industries

DECEMBER 01, 1995 by ALASTAIR SEGERDAL

Economics of Russian Crime

Russia Urgently Needs to Create a Stable, Orderly Society Based on an Effective Market

DECEMBER 01, 1995 by YURI N. MALTSEV

No Thanks, Uncle Sam

Entrepreneurial Women Can Make It On Their Own

DECEMBER 01, 1995 by ELIZABETH LARSON

Liberty and Immigration

Local Communities Should Decide Immigration Issues

DECEMBER 01, 1995 by THOMAS E. WOODS JR.

Coming to America: The Benefits of Open Immigration

America Owes Its Heritage to Open Borders

DECEMBER 01, 1995 by THOMAS E. LEHMAN

Thinking Carefully About Macroeconomics

Defenders of the Market Should Understand Fundamental Issues in Macroeconomics

DECEMBER 01, 1995 by STEVEN HORWITZ

Why Economists Need to Speak the Language of the Marketplace

Keynes' Modern-Day Followers Continue with His Distortions of Language

DECEMBER 01, 1995 by JAMES C. W. AHIAKPOR
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