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December 1999

Volume 49, 1999

FEATURES

Why Y2K?

The Y2K Decision Was Rooted in Imperfect Information

DECEMBER 01, 1999 by BILL REITZ

Reclassifying a Classic

A Christmas Carol Does Not Support a Welfare State

DECEMBER 24, 2013 by DANIEL OLIVER

A Christmas Carol remains a compelling story. But where it looks for salvation might surprise those who assume Dickens set out simply to indict business.

States' Rights Revisited

State Independence Checks Federal Aggrandizement

DECEMBER 01, 1999 by GENE HEALY

Welcome to Canada

Canada's Government Is Like a Dependent, Mildly Abusive Mother

DECEMBER 01, 1999 by MONTE SOLBERG

Freedom and Foreign Investment

Large International Corporations Are Not So Horrible After All

DECEMBER 01, 1999 by JAMES MADISON

The Poverty of Regulation

Interventionists Deceive an Unsuspecting Public

DECEMBER 01, 1999 by MICHAEL J. CATANZARO

A Lesson in Political Management

UNC's Campus Crisis Is Self-Created

DECEMBER 01, 1999 by GEORGE C. LEEF

The Force of Economics

Economics Is Everywhere

DECEMBER 01, 1999 by NINOS P. MALEK

China's Flirtation with Keynesian Economics

Deficit Spending and Money-Printing Will Not Improve China's Economy

DECEMBER 01, 1999 by CHRISTOPHER LINGLE

The Collectivist Illusion

Humanity Is Not an Organic Whole

DECEMBER 01, 1999 by TIBOR R. MACHAN
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April 2014

Around the world, people are struggling to throw off authoritarianism, with deeply mixed results. From Egypt to Venezuela, determined people build networks to overthrow their regimes, but as yet we have not learned to live without Leviathan. In this issue, Michael Malice and Gary Dudney discuss their glimpses inside totalitarian regimes, while Sarah Skwire and Michael Nolan look at how totalitarian regimes grind down the individual--and how individuals fight back. Plus, Jeffrey Tucker identifies a strain in libertarianism that, left unchecked, could reduce even our vibrant movement to something that is analogous to the grim aesthetic of architectural brutalism. The struggle for our lives and freedom is a struggle for beauty; it begins inside each of us.
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