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December 2001

Volume 51, 2001

FEATURES

How Henry Ford Zapped a Licensing Monopoly

All Ford Wanted Was the Opportunity to Compete Freely in the Market

DECEMBER 01, 2001 by MELVIN D. BARGER

Socialized Medicine Is the Problem

Demand Continues to Exceed Supply in Canada's Health Care Market

DECEMBER 01, 2001 by WALTER BLOCK

Wire and Rails: Comparing the Web and Railroads

The Internet Has Little in Common with the Transcontinental Railroads

DECEMBER 01, 2001 by LARRY SCHWEIKART

How War Amplified Federal Power in the Twentieth Century

Wars Have Increased Government Spending, Curtailed Free Speech, and Much, Much More

JULY 01, 1999 by ROBERT HIGGS

No Yahoo! for New Shareholder Plan

"Shareholder Rights" Plans Often Benefit Existing Management while Shortchanging Shareholders

DECEMBER 01, 2001 by GARY M. GALLES

Knut Wicksell: A Sesquicentennial Appreciation

Wicksell's Ideas Have as Much Interest Today as When He First Penned Them

DECEMBER 01, 2001 by RICHARD EBELING

Rolling Back the Market: Economic Dogma and Political Choice by Peter Self

Another Critique of the Free-Market System

DECEMBER 01, 2001 by MICHAEL D. MALLINGER

Peace on Earth, Good Will Toward Men Through Capitalism and Freedom!

Open Markets and Competition Bring Peace and Prosperity

DECEMBER 01, 2001 by MARK SKOUSEN

Don't Expect Much From Politics

Where Else Is Such Nonsense Allowed to Flourish?

DECEMBER 01, 2001 by LAWRENCE W. REED

Let Our Allies Defend Themselves

The United States Is Under No Obligation to Put the Interests of Other States or People First

DECEMBER 01, 2001 by DOUG BANDOW
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April 2014

Around the world, people are struggling to throw off authoritarianism, with deeply mixed results. From Egypt to Venezuela, determined people build networks to overthrow their regimes, but as yet we have not learned to live without Leviathan. In this issue, Michael Malice and Gary Dudney discuss their glimpses inside totalitarian regimes, while Sarah Skwire and Michael Nolan look at how totalitarian regimes grind down the individual--and how individuals fight back. Plus, Jeffrey Tucker identifies a strain in libertarianism that, left unchecked, could reduce even our vibrant movement to something that is analogous to the grim aesthetic of architectural brutalism. The struggle for our lives and freedom is a struggle for beauty; it begins inside each of us.
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