Freeman

December 2003

Volume 53, 2003

FEATURES

Ninety Years of Monetary Central Planning in the United States

Central Banking Has Enabled Extensive Political Influence on Economic Life

DECEMBER 01, 2003 by RICHARD EBELING

Feeling Their Oats

Tariffs and Quotas Encourage Poverty

DECEMBER 01, 2003 by SHELDON RICHMAN

Social Security: Mythmaking and Policymaking

The Government Program Is Robed in Myths

DECEMBER 01, 2003 by JOHN ATTARIAN

Beginning in 1935, when Social Security was enacted, the program's administrators made a huge effort to shape the public's understanding of and beliefs about it. In speeches, articles, pamphlets, and other mass-circulation literature, they described Social Security as "insurance" under which workers pay "contributions" or "premiums" to receive "guaranteed" benefits that, being "paid for," are theirs "as a matter of earned right," without any means test.1

The State Is the Source of Rights?

Law, Rights, and Security Are Often Provided Privately

DECEMBER 01, 2003 by DONALD BOUDREAUX

Aviation, People, and Incentives

Incentives and Competition Create Progress

DECEMBER 01, 2003 by RALPH HOOD

Thoughts of Miracles on the Plane

What Forces Make Air Travel Possible?

DECEMBER 01, 2003 by WILLIAM B. ZIEBURTZ JR.

The Birth of a Capitalist

Capitalist Profits Benefit Us All

DECEMBER 01, 2003 by DEAN RUSSELL

The Absurdity of "Saving Jobs"

Job Preservation Is a Misleading Concept

DECEMBER 01, 2003 by TIMOTHY D. TERRELL

Global Capitalism: Curing Oppression and Poverty

Capitalist Nations Are the Wealthiest in the World

DECEMBER 01, 2003 by ANDREW BERNSTEIN
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