Freeman

February 1971

Volume 21, 1971

FEATURES

Man and Miracle

FEBRUARY 01, 1971 by C. AUSTIN DECAMP

A tribute to George Washington and his role in the "Miracle at Philadelphia."

Consumerism

FEBRUARY 01, 1971 by MAX E. BRUNK

Consumerism is a movement of activists who champion issues which appear to be beneficial to consumers.

On Institutional Senescence

FEBRUARY 01, 1971 by PAUL H. JACOBSON

Let's re-examine the urge to create or perpetuate institutions that do not serve liberty.

The Liberation of Women: Thoughts on Reading Some Old Cookbooks

FEBRUARY 01, 1971 by BETTINA BIEN GREAVES

Capitalism has taken much of the drudgery out of homemaking and brought economic freedom to women.

The Medical Market Place

FEBRUARY 01, 1971 by A.R. PRUIT

The story of trouble in a regulated industry subjected to inordinate inflationary pressures.

The Lure of Nonprofitable Services

FEBRUARY 01, 1971 by KURT V. LEININGER

Some would have us abandon all else and work solely for the "public good."

False Remedies for Poverty

FEBRUARY 01, 1971 by HENRY HAZLITT

How union privileges, social measures, inflation, and more direct socialism all aggravate the problem of poverty.

Who Should Vote?

FEBRUARY 01, 1971 by PAUL L. POIROT

Your welfare may be in his hands.

A Reviewer's Notebook - 1971/2

FEBRUARY 01, 1971 by JOHN CHAMBERLAIN


"Did You Ever See a Dream Walking?" by William f. Buckley, JR.

"The Conservative Tradition in European Thought" edited by Robert Schuettinger


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