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February 1971

Volume 21, 1971

FEATURES

Man and Miracle

FEBRUARY 01, 1971 by C. AUSTIN DECAMP

A tribute to George Washington and his role in the "Miracle at Philadelphia."

Consumerism

FEBRUARY 01, 1971 by MAX E. BRUNK

Consumerism is a movement of activists who champion issues which appear to be beneficial to consumers.

On Institutional Senescence

FEBRUARY 01, 1971 by PAUL H. JACOBSON

Let's re-examine the urge to create or perpetuate institutions that do not serve liberty.

The Liberation of Women: Thoughts on Reading Some Old Cookbooks

FEBRUARY 01, 1971 by BETTINA BIEN GREAVES

Capitalism has taken much of the drudgery out of homemaking and brought economic freedom to women.

The Medical Market Place

FEBRUARY 01, 1971 by A.R. PRUIT

The story of trouble in a regulated industry subjected to inordinate inflationary pressures.

The Lure of Nonprofitable Services

FEBRUARY 01, 1971 by KURT V. LEININGER

Some would have us abandon all else and work solely for the "public good."

False Remedies for Poverty

FEBRUARY 01, 1971 by HENRY HAZLITT

How union privileges, social measures, inflation, and more direct socialism all aggravate the problem of poverty.

Who Should Vote?

FEBRUARY 01, 1971 by PAUL L. POIROT

Your welfare may be in his hands.

A Reviewer's Notebook - 1971/2

FEBRUARY 01, 1971 by JOHN CHAMBERLAIN


"Did You Ever See a Dream Walking?" by William f. Buckley, JR.

"The Conservative Tradition in European Thought" edited by Robert Schuettinger


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April 2014

Around the world, people are struggling to throw off authoritarianism, with deeply mixed results. From Egypt to Venezuela, determined people build networks to overthrow their regimes, but as yet we have not learned to live without Leviathan. In this issue, Michael Malice and Gary Dudney discuss their glimpses inside totalitarian regimes, while Sarah Skwire and Michael Nolan look at how totalitarian regimes grind down the individual--and how individuals fight back. Plus, Jeffrey Tucker identifies a strain in libertarianism that, left unchecked, could reduce even our vibrant movement to something that is analogous to the grim aesthetic of architectural brutalism. The struggle for our lives and freedom is a struggle for beauty; it begins inside each of us.
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