April Freeman Banner 2014

February 1972

Volume 22, 1972

FEATURES

Why Can't We Have Both?

FEBRUARY 01, 1972 by JEAN HOCKMAN

Reasons why the rejection of Capitalism in America ought to be reconsidered.

Rights and Pseudo-Rights

FEBRUARY 01, 1972 by JOHN D. LINDL

A genuine right applies equally to all, at the expense of no one in particular.

On Re-reading THE LAW

FEBRUARY 01, 1972 by RAY L. COLVARD

A book worth reading is worth reading again.

From Price Control to Valley Forge: 1777-78

FEBRUARY 01, 1972 by PERCY L. GREAVES JR.

A timely reminder of the sorry consequences of closing the market.

We and the Third World

FEBRUARY 01, 1972 by ERIK KUEHNELT-LEDDIHN

A realistic appraisal of the prospects of helping the developing nations.

The Modern Volunteer Army

FEBRUARY 01, 1972 by DAVID KRAMER

Concerning various aspects of the draft-army mentality that are inconsistent with a voluntary organization.

Should We Divide the Wealth?

FEBRUARY 01, 1972 by HENRY HAZLITT

To concentrate on the division of wealth is to neglect the production upon which all else depends.

Free Giving vs. the Welfare State

FEBRUARY 01, 1972 by CHARLES R. LADOW

Personal giving is the only kind; and it is best done voluntarily.

The Founding of the American Republic: 7. The First American Crisis: 1763-66

FEBRUARY 01, 1972 by CLARENCE B. CARSON

How George Ill and Parliament set the stage for colonial resistance.

A Reviewer's Notebook - 1972/2

FEBRUARY 01, 1972 by JOHN CHAMBERLAIN


"Toward Liberty" by various authors on 90th birthday of Ludwig von Mises.

"First Things, Last Things" by Eric Hoffer


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April 2014

Around the world, people are struggling to throw off authoritarianism, with deeply mixed results. From Egypt to Venezuela, determined people build networks to overthrow their regimes, but as yet we have not learned to live without Leviathan. In this issue, Michael Malice and Gary Dudney discuss their glimpses inside totalitarian regimes, while Sarah Skwire and Michael Nolan look at how totalitarian regimes grind down the individual--and how individuals fight back. Plus, Jeffrey Tucker identifies a strain in libertarianism that, left unchecked, could reduce even our vibrant movement to something that is analogous to the grim aesthetic of architectural brutalism. The struggle for our lives and freedom is a struggle for beauty; it begins inside each of us.
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