Freeman

February 1973

Volume 23, 1973

FEATURES

Controlling Pollution

FEBRUARY 01, 1973 by HANS SENNHOLZ

A search for ways to better define property rights and fix upon the owner the full advantages and the full costs of his use of his property.

The Anatomy of Consumerism

FEBRUARY 01, 1973 by MAX E. BRUNK

Movements for consumer protection seem to run in cycles, most of them short-lived and relatively harmless.

The Founding of the American Republic: 19. Establishing the Government

FEBRUARY 01, 1973 by CLARENCE B. CARSON

The story of the men and events in the precarious beginnings of Union under the Constitution.

Sheltering Ideologies

FEBRUARY 01, 1973 by LEONARD E. READ

"The guaranteed life turns out to be not only not free it's not safe."

The Myth of the Perfect Solution

FEBRUARY 01, 1973 by RIDGWAY K. FOLEY JR.

Neither men nor their institutions are perfect, but we need the freedom to keep trying for improvement.

Chaff About Wheat

FEBRUARY 01, 1973 by WILLIAM F. RICKENBACKER

Government meddling in the market for wheat forces taxpayers to pay for the inevitable mistakes.

Edmund Burke on Inflation and Despotism

FEBRUARY 01, 1973 by GARY NORTH

Burke's warning of the evils of inflation is as timely for us today as for the French of 1790 who failed to heed him.

A Reviewer's Notebook - 1973/2

FEBRUARY 01, 1973 by JOHN CHAMBERLAIN


"Trousered Apes" by Duncan Williams


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