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February 1973

Volume 23, 1973

FEATURES

Controlling Pollution

FEBRUARY 01, 1973 by HANS SENNHOLZ

A search for ways to better define property rights and fix upon the owner the full advantages and the full costs of his use of his property.

The Anatomy of Consumerism

FEBRUARY 01, 1973 by MAX E. BRUNK

Movements for consumer protection seem to run in cycles, most of them short-lived and relatively harmless.

The Founding of the American Republic: 19. Establishing the Government

FEBRUARY 01, 1973 by CLARENCE B. CARSON

The story of the men and events in the precarious beginnings of Union under the Constitution.

Sheltering Ideologies

FEBRUARY 01, 1973 by LEONARD E. READ

"The guaranteed life turns out to be not only not free it's not safe."

The Myth of the Perfect Solution

FEBRUARY 01, 1973 by RIDGWAY K. FOLEY JR.

Neither men nor their institutions are perfect, but we need the freedom to keep trying for improvement.

Chaff About Wheat

FEBRUARY 01, 1973 by WILLIAM F. RICKENBACKER

Government meddling in the market for wheat forces taxpayers to pay for the inevitable mistakes.

Edmund Burke on Inflation and Despotism

FEBRUARY 01, 1973 by GARY NORTH

Burke's warning of the evils of inflation is as timely for us today as for the French of 1790 who failed to heed him.

A Reviewer's Notebook - 1973/2

FEBRUARY 01, 1973 by JOHN CHAMBERLAIN


"Trousered Apes" by Duncan Williams


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Around the world, people are struggling to throw off authoritarianism, with deeply mixed results. From Egypt to Venezuela, determined people build networks to overthrow their regimes, but as yet we have not learned to live without Leviathan. In this issue, Michael Malice and Gary Dudney discuss their glimpses inside totalitarian regimes, while Sarah Skwire and Michael Nolan look at how totalitarian regimes grind down the individual--and how individuals fight back. Plus, Jeffrey Tucker identifies a strain in libertarianism that, left unchecked, could reduce even our vibrant movement to something that is analogous to the grim aesthetic of architectural brutalism. The struggle for our lives and freedom is a struggle for beauty; it begins inside each of us.
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