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February 1994

Volume 44, 1994

FEATURES

Welfare Spending

Antipoverty Spending Hasn't Lowered the Poverty Rate

FEBRUARY 01, 1994 by EXECUTIVE ALERT

The Economic Way of Thinking, Part 5

Incentives Explain Seemingly Irrational Human Behavior

FEBRUARY 01, 1994 by RONALD NASH

The Pharmaceutical Industry: Problem or Solution?

Health-Care Reform Should Involve a Search for Answers, Not Villains

FEBRUARY 01, 1994 by DOUG BANDOW

Environment and Free Trade

Countries Must Be Rich Before They Can Be Clean

FEBRUARY 01, 1994 by JO KWONG

Davis-Bacon: Jim Crow's Last Stand

The Davis-Bacon Act Imposes Tremendous Social and Economic Costs

FEBRUARY 01, 1994 by JOHN FRANTZ

Federal Transit Subsidies: How Government Investment Harms the U.S. Economy

Public Transit's Contributions to the U.S. Economy Are Pathetically Meager

FEBRUARY 01, 1994 by JOHN SEMMENS

Private Highways in America, 1792-1916

Toll Roads Make Economic Sense

FEBRUARY 01, 1994 by DANIEL KLEIN

Human Rights Around the Globe

Do Human Rights Differ by Country?

FEBRUARY 01, 1994 by TIBOR R. MACHAN

Jury Nullification: Cornerstone of Freedom

The Fully Informed Jury Is at the Bedrock of Our Republic

FEBRUARY 01, 1994 by ROGER KOOPMAN

The Unseen Costs of Family Leave

Government Mandates Create Disincentives to Hiring Women

FEBRUARY 01, 1994 by ROBERT A. SIRICO CSP
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Around the world, people are struggling to throw off authoritarianism, with deeply mixed results. From Egypt to Venezuela, determined people build networks to overthrow their regimes, but as yet we have not learned to live without Leviathan. In this issue, Michael Malice and Gary Dudney discuss their glimpses inside totalitarian regimes, while Sarah Skwire and Michael Nolan look at how totalitarian regimes grind down the individual--and how individuals fight back. Plus, Jeffrey Tucker identifies a strain in libertarianism that, left unchecked, could reduce even our vibrant movement to something that is analogous to the grim aesthetic of architectural brutalism. The struggle for our lives and freedom is a struggle for beauty; it begins inside each of us.
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