Freeman

February 1995

Volume 45, 1995

FEATURES

FEE in Eastern Europe

Eastern Europe Must Foster Private Property and Individual Initiative to Create Economic Recovery

FEBRUARY 01, 1995 by BETTINA BIEN GREAVES

Should Star Trek Be Regulated as a Monopoly?

The Marketing of Star Trek Is Economically Rational

FEBRUARY 01, 1995 by GARY NORTH

The Education of Thomas Edison

Homeschooling Paved the Way for Edison's Success

FEBRUARY 01, 1995 by JIM POWELL

E Pluribus Unum

What Principles Unite Americans?

FEBRUARY 01, 1995 by RALPH A. RAIMI

Dissatisfaction Guaranteed and No Money Back

A Free Market in Education Would Solve Public School Controversies

FEBRUARY 01, 1995 by LAWRENCE W. REED

Business–Government Collusion

Businesses Should End Their Dependence on Government Privilege

FEBRUARY 01, 1995 by ERIC BANFIELD

John C. Calhoun: Champion of Sound Economics

We Should Reconsider the Wisdom of the "Cast-Iron Man"

FEBRUARY 01, 1995 by WILLIAM J. WATKINS JR.

Land Control as Mind Control

All Law Works by Precedent

FEBRUARY 01, 1995 by JOHN CHODES

A Matter of Principle: To Educate Or Legislate?

Trying to Effect Change Through Politics Is Wasted Effort

FEBRUARY 01, 1995 by ROBERT JAMES BIDINOTTO

As I write, the President is publicly jousting with congressional Democratic rivals, and with Republican opponents, over competing initiatives to shrink government, cut spending, and reduce taxes. The current argument among politicians is no longer if such cuts are necessary, but where and how much to cut.

Self-Control, Not Gun Control

Are Guns to Blame for Violent Crime?

FEBRUARY 01, 1995 by CATHERINE FARMER
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